An internship is an opportunity for students to work in their chosen profession while attending school in order to gain valuable knowledge and work experience.



Most often, interns are not paid for the work they do monetarily, but are instead rewarded by the sharing of knowledge, ideas, opportunities for their portfolio, networks and possibly a permanent job offer if the intern takes advantage of the opportunity to be a valuable employee.
Students in the Valencia Graphics Department are required to take an internship. Students cannot take an internship until they have passed GRA2182C Advanced Graphic Design II OR GRA2143 Advanced Web Page Design with a C or higher. Students probably won’t qualify for a Graphics Internship until their final two semesters enrolled.

You will not be able to register for an internship without following the steps outlined on our blog:



http://valenciagraphicdesign.com/2017/01/plan-to-internship-nextsemester/

East Campus Lab Building 1 Room 213 

Students have access to large and small format laser and ink jet printers, various format paper cutters, board cutters, headphone check-out, loupe check-out, spray booth, viewing booth, light table, camera check-out, scanners, wacom tablet check-out and Cintiq monitors. All this in a friendly social working environment with a modern resources for students to browse and lounge while working on their laptops.

Phone: 407-582-2762           Visit http://multimedia.valenciacollege.edu for current hours and closed dates. Check before you drive.

No Food or Drink Allowed. Certain supplies like custom printing paper, staples, paperclips, xacto blades, adhesive, etc. not supplied to students in the lab.

West Campus Lab 3-150

Students have access to large and small format laser and ink jet printers, various cutting areas, headphone check-out, camera check-out, light table, scanners, loupe check-out, photo tent and wacom tablet check-out. Please be mindful if there are classes in session when using this lab by using only the computers in the back of the room.

Phone: 407-582-1592

No Food or Drink Allowed. Certain supplies like custom printing paper, staples, paperclips, xacto blades, adhesive, etc. not supplied to students in the lab.

Osceola Campus Lab 1-244

Students have access to large and small format laser and ink jet printers, various cutting areas, camera check-out, lights and light cube, media card readers, scanners, loupe check-out, Pantone swatch books, and wacom tablet check-out. Please be patient while we work on making lab improvements you’re going to love.

Phone 407-582-4953

No Food or Drink Allowed. Certain supplies like custom printing paper, staples, paperclips, xacto blades, adhesive, etc. might not be available for students in the lab.

Feel free to request more information! You can also stay up-to-date by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and Pinterest.




Kristy Pennino
East Campus Program Chair /
kpennino@valenciacollege.edu


Meg Curtiss
West Campus Program Chair /
mcurtiss@valenciacollege.edu





Complete list of all campus contacts


Five Signs You Should Not Major in Graphic Design

by kpennino on August 1, 2007

(An adaptation from Peter Vogt’s, “Five Signs you Should Change Your Major”.)

Give yourself a point for each question below you answer ‘yes’ to:

1. You’d rather be surfing Facebook or playing online games during a lecture or presentation or you can’t stop web surfing during class breaks.

Let’s face it, it’s not really the teacher’s lecture that has you so bored because you’re bored our of your mind when doing homework for graphics courses as well. Maybe you’re also having a hard time convincing yourself that you should keep trying to read that textbook or project description? We both know that it’s not that you don’t like to read, but more so that you would rather be reading something else like emails and new posts on your myspace page. It doesn’t have to be this way, you know? You shouldn’t have to try so hard to find something about graphic design that you’re interested in enough to let go of the myspace and dig, really dig, into graphic design on a deeper level. Couldn’t it be that you really don’t like design as much as you’re trying to convince yourself and everyone else you do?

2. You’re doing poorly in your current major courses.

No more excuses. If you really loved design enough you would never have a problem finding the time to take your work beyond minimal expectations for class. It’s not about how much time you have, but how much time you’re willing to spend on the things you love. Any “Cs” on your report card? Well guess what a “C” really means in this industry — someone who only meets minimal expectations — someone who’s unemployable. If you’re not excited enough to stay up late and sacrifice playtime beyond what is being asked of you for assignments, then it’s time you stopped claiming to love design. People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things, are constantly reading up on the topic and spend every bit of spare time perfecting their skills. They’re the ones you try to convince yourself are ‘naturally more talented than you are’ when really all they are is someone who loves design enough to spend the time needed to become GREAT instead of settling for GOOD.

3. You chose your current major because you think it will make you rich one day.

Every designer, art director, creative director in the industry will tell you that being a designer will not make you rich. It takes a certain combination of drive, enthusiasm and sacrifice to get past the entry level pay to getting paid well. Funny thing is that this is true for just about EVERY type of job someone would expect to land just out of college. In many industries this is called, “paying your dues” however, I prefer to call it, “a rite of passage”. Whomever has been telling you all these years that graphic designers get paid well to do “fun” things or worse, they’ve been telling you that getting a degree in graphic design will get you a job in graphic design is sorely mistaken. Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job. And if you don’t have the strong portfolio, drive, enthusiasm and willingness to sacrifice your time when you’re getting started in the industry your career will go nowhere.

4. You keep reading about other majors of interest and/or think you might be better at something else.

Want to get set on the right foot starting today? Then make sure your school goals are to LEARN and not just to get a degree. No matter what career it is you end up finally choosing, make sure you’re goal is to learn everything you can possibly learn while you have the opportunity and the benefit of someone who is there to mentor you and teach you what it is you need to learn. Although it is the responsibility of a teacher to teach, it is the responsibility of the student to make sure he/she is actually learning. Keep in mind, however, that if you’ve selected a career direction that you aren’t excited about, you will be reluctant to want to learn that content. Oh, and I just can’t resist right now — stop blaming the teacher for your reluctance to learn because that bad habit will get you in a heap of a mess when it comes to one of the most important job skills you could ever hope to have — independent learning beyond what is taught in a classroom.

5. You just can’t stop wondering whether or not you should be majoring in graphic design.

Generally this type of wondering comes from no being satisfied with your reasons for choosing to be a graphic designer. If your reasons aren’t making a whole lot of sense to you, then change your plan and change your major. Choosing a major is an important life decision that brings with it peer pressure and other types of obligatory pressure (such as the desire to finish what you’ve started) that are often not good enough reasons to continue on the wrong path. Make sure you haven’t chosen to be a graphic designer based upon what someone else wants with your life and also make sure you haven’t made your decision based upon your need to satisfy societal or other pressures. As was mentioned before, and really it doesn’t just apply to being a designer — if you’re not excited and happy doing what you’re going to school for, you’re not going to be happy or successful as a professional either.

So nows the time to total up your score. If you have given yourself three points or more, then make up your mind to change your major today. If you’ve given yourself two points, then you will probably want to run your ideas by one of your professors or a career counselor. You might even want to try some soul searching by logging into your atlas account and checking out “My LifeMap” and “My Career Planner” for alternate career options that would best suit your desires and abilities. If you gave yourself one point or no points, don’t go changing your major just yet, it could just be that you’re really close to finding that one thing about graphic design that will have you hooked for life.

  • eddie

    I couldn’t agree with you more. Hard work pays off short term and long term.

    There is just one thing. It’s not that I don’t like to read, I can’t read. That’s why I don’t pay attention in any of my classes.

  • Chris Anemone

    I’ve been questioning whether or not I want to do graphic design ever since I first started. Unfortunately it’s the only thing I’m sufficiently interested in enough to pursue.

    I mean, I’m interested in a tonne of other things but I can’t see myself doing them successfully…even design; which, I’m good at but can’t hold a candle compared to many of the people I’ve had in my classes. But I’ve committed so much time and money to it already that I’m fairly stuck with it now.

    And after all that investment it’s such a great thing to go on interview after interview only to be told I don’t have enough experience.

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  • Daissy

    I’m so glad someone said something about this. Now you got me talking!

    I totally respect people’s reasons to do what they do and how. However, it is hard for me to find people that is as pasionate about design as I am. Of course I wouldn’t deny that in this career I’ve met some of the most interesting people ever, with such different backgrounds, desires, goals, abilities, visions. And that is how I really enjoy everthing about this world, that anything you get to experience can be applied to your work. But as far as loving what you do even if you starve, I think I am guilty of having an artist soul in that sence. I’ve come to breath, eat, see, I mean everything around design. Like when you wake up in the middle of the night with the best idea ever and you just need to fill a white sheet of paper with it. Or when you forget to have lunch because you are so into the process of your piece that every other need is meaningless.

    However, after three years trying to accomplish something important, not because a diploma means much to me but because it would look pretty neat on my parents living room, I’ve come to realize that it takes much more than desire and will. One has to become this whole package of goodies for someone to hire you. Be on time, look neat for your interview, talk about yourself and what you have done, network, etc. Also, it is important to realize how it really works in the real world. That that awesome poster you spent hours on once is printed, if it gets that far, will simply end up in the trash can the next day.

    So that is why I take college as a life experience. At this point is not about getting good grades or pretending to be better than anybody. I just hope someone appreciates what I do, what this means to me, and helps me explore what I am capable of.

    Oh my…did I just typed all that? wow…so I guess talk to you all when we come back from the summer break.
    See you at the lab or in class!

    Hasta luego colegas!
    -Daissy*

  • charles

    I SCORED A ZERO, WHO RAH!

  • Efrain Lugo

    I couldnt agree more on number 2 and 4.

    “People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things, are constantly reading up on the topic and spend every bit of spare time perfecting their skills.”

    - Its funny cuz I carry a whole mini studio in my bag… nikon d40x, studio microphone, labtop(with cs3 suite), dv camera, flash books or communication arts annual, sketch paper… You always have to be prepared hehhh lol… I just wish they made portable scanners.

    “— stop blaming the teacher for your reluctance to learn because that bad habit will get you in a heap of a mess when it comes to one of the most important job skills you could ever hope to have — independent learning beyond what is taught in a classroom.”

    I couldn’t agree more there are so many resources people can go to learn independtly. For me lynda.com is a good one, amazon.com (lots of books on every topic of design and animation), library (yes sometimes you can pick up some old books on perspective and lighting). There are even plenty more links for inspiration people can go to a good place to start would be amanda’s blinklist. http://blinklist.com/amandakern

    Oh and I scored a zero too WOOT!!!

  • http://panarican.com Efrain Lugo

    OMG they do sell portable scanners I did a google search… Im so getting it droooooool…

    http://www.scanshell-store.com/hardware_ss2000n.htm?Source=adwords&Campaign=PortScan&AdGro=PortScan&gclid=CNzOz-Cc140CFTaEOAod_0COlg

  • Daissy

    lol.
    Efrain, no wonder people look at us weird when we are carrying all this stuff with us every where. That is the thing with inspiration, it is every where on everything, so we better be prepare to capture it!
    Never been happier to score 0 on something :P

  • reina.

    i’ve been through moments when i just start thinking if i made the right choice to stay in this country and begin a career in the graphic design field. i dont regret it at all, but sometimes you do start to feel that everything is just falling on you and you just start thinking what would’ve happened if i had made a different choice. i am lucky that my family is super supportive with what i do and what i want to accomplish but definitely what really makes me stop having these dumb existensialist crisis of whether or not should i continue or just become a lawyer or something, is the fact that thanks to the way the two years i’ve been involved with the program, it has changed the way i approach these problems. its kind of like approaching a project at school but in a bigger scale. if something is not working right, you just adjust everything and try new solutions and discover new ways of solving them. i think that even if down the road we do not end up being THE graphic designer we all wish to be one day, just by the fact that we’ve gone through all of this right now, it has completely changed the way we see everything for the rest of our lives.

    “People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things”

    i guess it’d be redundant to say that this is totally true. Although If I may say so, Efrain beat us all by far hehe. I think that McGyver could totally build a bomb with all the stuff we carry around in a daily basis =P

    funny how things are. aren’t we all supposed to be out of school and enjoying the few weeks we have before the fall semester starts, yet we are still here checking the blog once in a while and see what’s going on… =]

  • http://panarican.com Efrain Lugo

    McGyver is awesome all he needs is a paper clip
    check it out here:

    http://farm1.static.flickr.com/151/395376506_9f9213734f_o.jpg

  • reina.

    what McGyver can do with a paper clip, we can do with an x-acto knife =P

  • http://vccgraphics.wordpress.com/ kristy pennino

    If you’re looking for something to do the next couple of weeks, check out the latest blog posting! ha! Who needs a summer break!? ;-)

  • dennis

    If you find yourself …
    Awake at 3 in the morning working on a project that you realize was graded two semesters ago but you just had to change it …you just might have chosen the right path (not stroke).

  • kristy pennino

    right on, dennis!

  • http://www.imluvingit.com Luvlee

    nice one:)

  • k. simari

    nice post! good responces. you know, its a passion, even for me, the degree doesnt really matter to me, but obviously it is needed. I am first an artist. Graphic design is just another way to express my creativeness and ideas. I have learned so much while in school. I can tell you all about hours and hours of research, hours and hours trying to make one little thing happen. It takes so much dedication.
    I can honestly say, I actually get pissed when critique day comes and there seems to always be at least one or two people that you just sit back and say, “are they for real?”
    One time I told this person I was in Graphic Design and she says to me, oh, I make brocures and stuff with microsoft publisher…. ha. i was like ummmm….. yea, ok.
    i just hate it when people dont take it serious.
    this is my life, its all i can think about. I might not carry around a bunch of stuff, but i lock it all in my mind, when I get home, I sketch, or sometimes even just go straight to the computer, because I get too excited to wait, I have skipped meals too, trying to keep myself awake with diet cokes and coffee.
    Hey! Ive fallen asleep at the computer a few times!!!! thats crazy.
    as far as school, and my degree, I care about my grades, and I care about striving to have the best peice, because in this career, you have to be competitive. and let me tell you, i am the first to say i have had some good competition! Efrain is one of them! :)
    another sign that you should not major in graphic design, is if you think its ok to turn in your typography book with a cover made of notebook paper with a pencil drawing, that you did in the first 10 minutes of class… ewwwww that was the worst by FARRRRRR! true story! it happened in my typography class! sorry. but that was pathetic.

  • Daissy

    I agree with K. about competition!
    I was not a natural at the beginning, believe me, I just couldn’t care less! But since one of my pieces entered in the student show in my first graphics class and started to understand what judges were looking for now I just can’t stop. It really teaches you to choose your battles, to rase your level from concept to presentation, and gives you recognition needed to fit well in this industry. However, the most exciting part is simply testing your luck and representing well our teachers and classmates.

    We all have a lot to be proud of. Our program rocks! :P
    Sorry if it sound weird, but I’m proud to be part of all this! *sniff*

  • http://panarican.com Efrain Lugo

    Daissy im crying inside too sniff sniff… GO VCC GRAPHICS!!! I still can’t believe I have one semester left! I’m going to miss everyone once I’m done.

  • Heather

    Hi, I have currently moved into the area and will be attending Valencia for GD, I have some previous college history with GD, but that college ended up to be a disaster. Anyways I am in a rut now that I have been out of college for about 7 months. I am constantly questioning if Graphics is the right career path for me now or if I should redirect myself. But whenever I see a magazine or a billboard I always critique it! I always am researching GD on the internet and purchasing books. I love art in general, especially print, but for some I guess, it is just a hobby. What is the true daily life of a Graphic Designer, and how can I try to guide myself to finding if this is truly the right career path for me! Please comment, all help is needed.

    Thank you

  • http://rabbitinabox.com Kenny Roy

    This blog post and all the comments are awesome!! Katie pretty much said most of the things I would say. But I’ll tell you a secret.. I thought once I was out of school and working in graphics 9-5 M-F that I’d get my sleep and my evening time back. It was not the case at all, maybe for like 2 weeks. My life is design… I see it everywhere. I even yell at billboards with bad typography while driving! I still find myself up till 4am sometimes learning/working on new design techniques and tools. I seriously wish After Effects had been part of the program, I can’t get enough of it! I could talk about this stuff for hours of course.. I just wanted to say you guys are right on.. and it keeps getting better all the time!!

    ps. Dennis, that’s hilarious!!

  • http://www.zumafu.com Colette Ruff

    This is a great article Kristy! KUDOS!

    Now I don’t feel like such a geek anymore. I have had so many people asking me should they go into graphic design to attempt to make the money I currently am. My response always is, do you have the dedication to stay up for 36hrs to get something just right? If so, then you MIGHT have what it takes.

    I love what I do. I see everything as if, I could use that on my next project, or that is a cool and weird shape (as I look into the EXHAUST Vent thinking of ways I could put that design into this new mockup). Design is out life, without it, everything would look the same.

    How many of you have looked at the new trends in fashion and thought the designs were cool enough to put in a print or web piece? If you answered yes then you are in the right field!

  • Daissy

    As a student assistant in the graphics lab I had seen many graduates before me trying to make the best of what they have learned and make the right choices for their future. I feel like at some degree I lived all of their insecurities and their success just by been around them in a regular basis, and even though I feel more confident on my work and what I can do, I have to say that I have my own insecurities and questions that can only be answered from within. Trying and failing is better than never experience. We all have our own way and reasons to be here, but we all share the love for design and you either decide to commit yourself to it, meaning not sleeping for instance, or you don’t.
    My personal experience says it is worth the effort!

  • soujohn

    *************WARNING*******************
    This is the angriest blog posting ever.

    I’m so glad this blog post is here. Now although I might be guilty of a few of the five reasons to not major in graphic design, guess what. I already did. Ha!

    But my real point is to vent and sing praise. First off, to any student who doesn’t understand why Amanda made you do so many sketches. Trust me your first idea wasn’t that fabulous. What makes you think that students from the past 5 semesters didn’t have that exact same idea? Everything your instructors make you do is critical to the design process. Believe me, when you get a job in the “real world” those first ten sketches are gonna get spit on. Keep in mind our job as designers and lifestyle as creatives is to think outside the box. The first idea you get when brainstorming for a project is so deep inside the box that I can predict your font choice. And so help me if its Comic Sans or Papyrus I will Command+K your sorry tail so fast.

    Do you wanna know when you are finally thinking outside the box? Huh, do you? You know that feeling you get when you come up with an idea, and your eyes open real wide and you stretch this huge smile across your face. You’re so excited that you still can’t fully explain your idea in words. Its almost like the idea just hit you. No, it didn’t hit you. You just fell out of the box. Now keep going.

    Working in the lab has shown me how spoiled we really are. Dennis, I finally know what you’re talking about. I know some of you still don’t totally understand, but believe me we are. During my internship this summer I had the opportunity to intern alongside UCF and IADT students, and some of the things I’ve learned about their schools is unbelievable. These students have actually said that they envy our program. I don’t want to go too far into it, because it will sound like I’m dissing UCF and IADT (but I’m not). I just feel like students from other schools realize what a great thing we have, and we don’t. We, as VCC students, have some of the greatest resources in just our professors. You should actually talk to them, y’know get some feedback and inspiration, instead of just hating on the projects they assign you. Its not their fault you spent the first 120 hours of project 2 browsing myspace. I could take up whole blog entries explaining why each of our instructors is great.

    And quit complaining about how you don’t have any time to work on your project because you have a job/life. Trust me, I know how hard it is. In this past year I’ve had a son, purchased a home, lost a major job, picked up a 2nd job, completed my portfolio, and an internship. I mean, if you’re paying to take the class and paying for the books, make your time worth the money you spent. Try actually reading text book – Except you Eddie, you’re exempt from reading – Because crying and moaning isn’t going to make your print look any more like what you got on screen. You’ve got to find ways to focus and redirect your energy into your projects.

    I think I’ve rambled on enough, let me wrap this up. For those of you who don’t know if this is for you, its okay. You have to develop principals before you develop a passion. You all may not get it right away, but DON’T….COMPLAIN…ABOUT…IT. If you find any type of enjoyment in the process of your projects there may still be room for you in this field. But don’t expect to sit @ a computer and Ellison up a hybrid campaign in just a few mouse clicks.

    I remember Kristy said once that if you really wanna know if you love design…treat it like a person. If you love design you think about it all the time, and when you’re not designing you wish you were. You think of different ways to show how much you love it. You make sacrificies for it. You see design even when its not there, where people usually wouldn’t see it because that’s all you can think about. Get the point? Okay I’m done.

    Oh yeah, and in my bag (which looks like a turtle shell cause its so packed) I have sketchbooks, Prismacolor markers, pens, graphite pencils, kneaded erasers, vinyl erasers, a rounded corner cutter, embossing pen, perforating tool, digital cam, X-actos, a loupe, @ least four kinds of adhesive, and an extra mouse.

  • kristy pennino

    well said, john, thanks for the insight. on a side note, i KNOW you have more than that in your bag! ha!

  • http://www.thinblackglasses.com Kevin M. Scarbrough

    John,
    You nailed it, brother.

    Heather,
    I’m a VCC grad and I freelance in design and illustration. Freelancing is a LOT different from working in a studio, so please take this with a grain of salt as if you ask a variety of people you are going to get a variety of answers (as a matter of fact, I encourage you to ask a variety of people).

    I like to start my day at about 5 – 6 AM (and am successful most days. Coffee is a drug, not a miracle). I get up, read Design Observer, SpeakUp, Unbeige to see what is going on. I read my e-mail and respond to the pertinent bits.

    I spend about 1-2 hours sketching and working on the concepts for the day’s work in the beginning. I hate sketching in a book, I prefer the cheap translucent paper that Sam Flax sells on a roll (12″ x 50′ for about $6).

    Pencil, then marker. Always pencil first. Cut out of the sketch paper, scan, e-mail to client. Sometimes I call the client to let them know it is coming and discuss immediately, others I wait for a response e-mail. You learn to figure out what to do with who based on your relationship with them, and if they are comfortable talking on the phone or via e-mail (a good tip is how they contact you).

    Depending on the rush of jobs or not, I either begin production on things with comps approved or furiously do more sketching / contacting. This, again, depends on the job and the client. Sometimes you’ll get someone who calls you and they need X done by noon, sometimes your deadline is in the ethereal (I hate that, because this unknown date exists, and will crop up almost before it’s too late).

    I prefer holding off on sending things to printers / calling printers until mid afternoon. This way I can do it all at once.

    At some point in there, I sleep for an hour to 90 minutes. I don’t sleep much (or well) at night, so while everyone else is fighting lunch traffic, I catch up here.

    Random, weekly things are peppered in there like going to the art store for supplies (once a week), searching for new work (every few days), or updating my portfolio site (every week).

    A quick comment on that last bit, then I’ll cut this lose. Updating portfolio sites, updating your portfolio. Do it often. I cannot tell you how many times I get a call or e-mail from someone who wants a sample of something, I’ve done it 3 times this past week (quick side note: as a freelancer you learn to deal with rejection / never being called back quickly. It isn’t personal, it is business).

    The most important things I can think of about being a graphic designer is to be curious, and have the courage to act upon it.

  • soujohn

    For anyone who hasn’t had the pleasure of meeting or knowing Kevin, he rarely sleeps. So when he says he gets 90min of sleep daily means he is sleeping alot. Kevin has been known for working 72 hours ‘sans sleep’. He’s done 96 before, but things gets dangerous then. Kevin has developed a technique I like to call “binge designing”, and has definitely mastered it. I’m sure he would’nt recommend it for everyone, but, hey, he said be curious…so be curious. Kudos to you my friend. Thank you for sharing your work ethic with us.

  • http://vccgraphics.wordpress.com/ Amanda Kern

    Wow! Excuse me for hiding under a rock and not commenting sooner. But I must admit – it’s been interesting reading all of the comments. It sounds like those of you who are commenting have definitely “got” what we all harp about week in and week out – every single semester! I’m glad to hear so many people admitting to having the
    design disease.
    I haven’t met many true designers that don’t admit to their obsession with design – you definitely should learn to live, eat, and breathe everything design at some point early on in your graphic design education. And perhaps if Kristy and the other students commenting haven’t made that obvious – design definitely becomes something you can’t let go of – even after you leave class or work. You see it in everything you do and everywhere you go.

    In fact, you know you’ve got this obsession when:

    you’ve annoyed someone because you’re offended that they have writing in comic sans on the side of their car. But then again, putting “to serve an protect” in comic sans on the side of a police car helps right?

    Or when you receive a brochure in the mail that is comprised of nothing but huge images and the infamous brush script.

    Or you pick up a brochure or magazine and instantly notice widows, orphans, and images that have moire patterns or are extremely pixelated

    And if you’re a web/interactive designer we could go on….

    When you cross paths with a web site that works on nothing but netscape, internet explorer 4. Or it doesn’t work at all on a mac!

    Heck, you visit a flash web site that STILL has LONG intros that are totally useless.

    Or running into a web site that was made by a table pushing designer and looks like it was designed in 1996 when beveled and embossed buttons where the new “cool” trick.

    Or, looking at just about any myspace layout could possible give a designer a heart attack – with bouncing animated gifs, rainbow gradients, or transparency on top of images making it completely impossible to read a thing!

    And when you try to explain yourself to your non-designer friends or family they might look at you like you really do have a “disease”. But as most designers who’ve been in the industry for sometime will tell you – this is a big part of being a designer. It goes to show you LOVE what you do so much that you live it through almost every moment of your life! You learn to admire every little thing about design that inspires you – and be equally annoyed seeing all of the bad design that has made it’s way into public view.

    Now though at some point we’d typically love you all to say “no” to all those questions/topics Kristy has listed above – I must admit that I myself have been guilty at some point to saying “yes” to the last two questions. I hate to be devil’s advocate here – but the major you choose – will also become your career. It’s a job you’ll have to do day in and day out once you graduate. It’s only naturally to contemplate if the decision you’ve made is “right”. And in fact, some of our best students have come into our program as a part of other majors or other professions to discover that they have the design obsession most great designers possess.

    So if you find yourself at times reevaluating your decisions or thinking you might want to major in something else – definitely don’t get discouraged. Remember, your education is just a starting point – and even after school – it never ends. The desire for life long learning is one of the strongest assets anyone can have – in any career. Besides, I’ll be the first to admit I will be the first to admit that when I see “other degrees” or other things I want to learn – I want to take a stab at them if they interest me because I WANT to learn more. Who knows – you might major in graphic design and end up a designer, an art director, a programmer, the CEO of a company or heck – even a teacher. So to sum it up…do what you LOVE to do and in time you will see that life will find just the right path for you.

  • greg

    “don’t expect to sit @ a computer and Ellison up a hybrid campaign in just a few mouse clicks.”

    haha! john that is truly one of the funniest phrases I’ve ever heard coined involving VCC graphics!

    Next time i’m about to print and am doing the last couple things to a project i’m going to say a few more clicks and this thing will be “an Ellision”!

  • greg

    “But then again, putting “to serve an protect” in comic sans on the side of a police car helps right?”

    amanda please tell me you’re joking – there is no way that a law enforcement vehicle used comic sans, was it atleast a 4th grade D.A.R.E. officer’s vehicle using it only for kid appeal?

  • http://vccgraphics.wordpress.com/ Amanda Kern

    Yes, I’m confident of comic sans on a police car…it’s on the side of just about everyone in the county! I’ve even seen some local schools with letterhead that are entirely designed in comic sans! :o ) I guess it goes to show that good bit of the population, besides designers, do still enjoy that typeface. Haha. Luckily that doesn’t make it right!

  • eddie

    lets go peel it off of every police car in the county. kevin berry wouldn’t mind. we would be “serving and protecting” the community against bad design.

  • http://www.picturesquestudios.com Stephen

    I can agree with the list put on this page but I also think that in some regards it comes across as a little condescending to people who perhaps should not major in graphic design. Just because you shouldn’t major in graphic design doesn’t mean you don’t have valuable skills that could be used somewhere else. Also it is a completely normal thing for people to try out different majors or fields until they can find one that suits them. This can take several years to figure out and sometimes lasts long after graduating college.

  • kristy pennino

    hi stephen,

    i think your comments provide valuable opposition to the wording of the article. i did struggle with the idea of instead naming the article “5 cautionary signs that you have chosen a course of study that will never make you happy”.

    choosing a career is a lot like choosing a life partner. we all know how unhappy we end up when we ignore the obvious warning signs in the beginning. unfortunately, it’s often hindsight that has one saying, “if i had only paid attention to those red flags instead of ignoring them i wouldn’t have wasted so much time and money in this relationship”.

    sadly enough, even an article worded in a way to ‘shock’ someone into paying attention to the warning signs isn’t effective for everyone. i still see many students trying very hard to convince themselves (and others) they they’re happy designing. they’re the ones that tell me after they graduate and make another career change they wish they had paid more attention to their heart and less attention to their stubborn desire to just finish what they started.

    i know it’s easy to ‘get me wrong’ here considering the harsh wording of my article, but i’m a firm believer that encouraging someone to flounder around for years spending money and wasting time isn’t a healthy suggestion. i would simply consider myself irresponsible if i (knowing i’ll be paying off my school loans until i’m 60 years old) were to encourage someone to accrue a lifetime of debt trying out different majors.

    i would even consider it irresponsible to encourage someone who was doing the same with other people’s money.

  • Tiffany Ramirez

    if you’re not excited and happy doing what you’re going to school for, you’re not going to be happy or successful as a professional either.
    I chose this excerpt because it is absolutely true!
    Someone can be good at something and even spend the time, money, and effort going to school because they feel that it is the only thing they are good at. If they are unhappy then it will eventually show in their work, not only in school but in their professional and personal lives as well.

  • frances Barra

    “They’re the ones you try to convince yourself are ‘naturally more talented than you are’ when really all they are is someone who loves design enough to spend the time needed to become GREAT instead of settling for GOOD.”
    I like this statement because I believe it is true in all areas of life. I believe that anyone who is “ok” with settling for good enough will never be happy – whether it’s in school, design, work or in relationships. I agree that when we do settle it’s simply because we have come to accept that the efforts of our time, energy or talents are being wasted. The end result will alway equal the pain or sacrifice we are willing to put in. If we do not get the desired end result, it is easier to make an excuse for those who did get our result rather than having an honest look inward.
    I greatly care about my work because…
    1. I get lost in the creation. It is enjoyable for me.
    2. It feel the end product represents me, and I want it to represent me well.
    …therefore, the extra time taken is worth it for me. Where I am need help is to know when to stop, as I am a tough critic on myself.

  • Virginia Carpenter

    “People who really love design… spend every bit of spare time perfecting their skills”

    I disagree with this statement. I’ve always been offended by the stereotype of the suffering artist who puts their art above all else in life. To be effective and sustainable in any field, you need life balance – time to follow other interests and goals. Obsessively dedicating yourself to perfecting your skills can be constrictive to your overall creativity. By putting down the pencil, camera, computer, etc. and allowing the mind to take a rest often results in being able to look at your work in a different way when you return.

    Besides, since the best inspiration comes from unexpected places, it’s only by going out in life that gives you the creative resources to excel at design.

    Overall, a good article that provides a lot of thought-provoking statements for someone starting out in introductory design classes.

  • http://www.myspace.com/mudshck Francisco

    “People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things”

    I have to disagree simply because each artist is different, each artist get inspired in different ways!! Just because someone doesn’t not carry a camera or a sketch book doesn’t mean he’s not passionate about something!!

  • Gilberto Sanchez

    “Every designer, art director, creative director in the industry will tell you that being a designer will not make you rich. It takes a certain combination of drive, enthusiasm and sacrifice to get past the entry level pay to getting paid well.”

    After doing research in high school i did find out that yes graphic design will not make you rich unless you start your own company or freelance. I have spoken to several graphic designers and they have all said that freelancing is probably your best bet if you do look for money. But me i don’t really care as long as i’m doing something i like i’m fine with it.

  • http://www.georgettetorres.com georgette torres

    “People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things”

    Many times I have discovered the most interesting thing to be just an ordinary everyday object or place that you just happen to find randomly, without any prior planing. And that is when i am glad I always have a camera with me

    Although i might not always use the material is better to have more and reserve for later than work with an empty hand

  • Janae’ Britt

    “Keep in mind, however, that if you’ve selected a career direction that you aren’t excited about, you will be reluctant to want to learn that content.”

    This sentence really hits home to me, as I have experienced this first hand. This statement should be obvious and yet so many of us make this type of mistake in our own lives.

  • Jodi Miller

    “It’s not about how much time you have, but how much time you’re willing to spend on the things you love.”

    Nicely put. I see people that use time as a crutch (“I didn’t have time to do xyz”) and I’d be lying if I said I never have. I’m inspired by people who can prioritize their time and create boundaries for their passions. We should really say, “It’s not that I didn’t HAVE the time, it’s that I didn’t MAKE the time.”

  • Allen Rayner

    “Funny thing is that this is true for just about EVERY type of job someone would expect to land just out of college” some of my peers in class always ask me “how is this related to what we are studying?” The truth is the more you know the better you are equiped to compete in an world where people are combining their degrees to become a better candidate for hire, and it’s becoming more common everyday, so the more you know the better.

  • leah webb

    Thankfully I scored a zero on this. Good to know I have realistic expectations on what to get out of this program. Now that I am a little more older and wiser, I feel that I have more energy and patience towards school. Instead of feeling ovewhelmed, I feel that I can step back and put things into perspective to accomplish my goals. Of course it still is early in the semester, so I may feel differently in a month, but for now. I’m in a good place. I do have to say, for those of you who surf in class, shame on you! It is very distracting for those of us who are trying to learn!

  • Rose Batignani

    If you’re not excited enough to stay up late and sacrifice playtime beyond what is being asked of you for assignments, then it’s time you stopped claiming to love design.

    This seems to be the motto for most graphic designers. I live with a photographer so I know the long crazy hours he plugs away in photoshop.

    Great designers are those who love their work and go above and beyond the required time to create an outstanding piece of work. If someone is not willing to sacrifice a lot of time as a designer then they need to realize that their competition is spending the time. You should not wake up hating your job and force yourself to create assignments. A person should always do what they love and if you don’t want to give extra hours to perfecting your assignment then you probably do not love what you do.

  • Ann OKeeffe

    “If you really loved design enough you would never have a problem finding the time to take your work beyond minimal expectations for class.”

    I selected this text because it is such a significant point. And I agree with this statement. We often find our selves spending our time on this things we most enjoy, and push our selves to excel at it.

  • Lyska. Vanté

    “if you’re not excited and happy doing what you’re going to school for, you’re not going to be happy or successful as a professional either.”
    Behold this newsflash!
    Great developping point on the facts of carrer choice and happiness within.
    All I have to say: When you are willing to sacrifice many things for another… you are already successful. Find what you would give yourself entirely; there youll find no regrets!

  • http://decisiveorigin.com Laurie L Thomas

    “You keep reading about other majors of interest and/or think you might be better at something else.”

    this past semester I switched from Business to Graphic design. Went through the same problems
    I would surf the internet (if there was computers), draw in class or just flat out plan some creative projects to do on my own time (or class time if I can get away with it)

    after about 3 terms wasted, I just had to switch

  • Melissa Provenzano

    “And if you don’t have the strong portfolio, drive, enthusiasm and willingness to sacrifice your time when you’re getting started in the industry your career will go nowhere.”

    I chose this excerpt because I believe it is very significant for this article. It is completely true; one must be fully committed on all levels, because it’s pretty impossible to get anything done if you know deep down you don’t want to do it. Why waste your time and everyone else’s? If one really has the desire, which I believe I have, to design and be able to deal with everything that comes along with it, then graphic design is the right major to be pursuing.

  • Michelle Ledesma

    “stop blaming the teacher for your reluctance to learn because that bad habit will get you in a heap of a mess when it comes to one of the most important job skills you could ever hope to have”

    i agreer because its not your teachers its all you and whether not not you have the want and will to do it

  • Michelle Ledesma

    “stop blaming the teacher for your reluctance to learn because that bad habit will get you in a heap of a mess when it comes to one of the most important job skills you could ever hope to have”

    i agree with this because its not your teachers its all on you and weather or not you have the will and the wants to get it done

  • Audrey Bay

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job.”

    I work in the publishing industry and have seen many graphic designers come and go. They clearly have the education necessary, but just don’t end up making the cut. Graphic design, as with any other profession, is what you make of it. If you’re going into it for the wrong reasons (ie. to make lots of money), then you will not succeed. It has to be your passion and you must be willing to continually improve. Anyone can pass a class and get their degree, but not everyone will take that degree and use it to its highest potential. You MUST want it; if you don’t want it, your employer will initially or eventually decide that they do not want you.

  • Doris Rosado

    Every designer, art director, creative director in the industry will tell you that being a designer will not make you rich.

    I choose these lines from the previous blog articles because many students ive had the opportunty to take classes with what that comment that drives them is the money and how famous and rich they plan on being in this industry which in many cases causes its not true and several students drop the degree because they arent willing to actually work to reach there long term goals.

  • Jen Hubert

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job. And if you don’t have the strong portfolio, drive, enthusiasm and willingness to sacrifice your time when you’re getting started in the industry your career will go nowhere.”

    In a way I agree with the statement “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job” I feel degrees help with getting a job, but if you want it bad enough you should go for it most likely nothing will be handed to you. Also If you are passionate about something I don’t think the pay or a little sacrifice should matter if it’s what you really want. You should never do anything just for the pay.

  • Javon Johnson

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job”

    I agree with this 100%. So many people still think that once “I have a Master Degree or once I have this B.A, companies will be beating down my door”. You have to be the aggressor, you have to actively pursue companies. Its not easy out there in Corporate America.

  • lilymommy2000

    This line really spoke to me

    It takes a certain combination of drive, enthusiasm and sacrifice to get past the entry level pay to getting paid well

    I chose this line because I have a definite fear of all the competition for great jobs in orlando. This line gives me hope that if I work hard enough, stay up late enough and create my butt off I’ll actually have a chance in the murky shark infested waters.

    Lily Goldsmith GDE

  • Jonathan DuFault

    “Every designer, art director, creative director in the industry will tell you that being a designer will not make you rich. It takes a certain combination of to get past the entry level pay to getting paid well.”

    This reminded me of my uncle who is an amazing Graphic artist. I would say that he is fairly successful in what he does. I remember one day when he came to visit me when I was first starting college, I told him that I wanted to be a graphic designer also. He asked me what made me choose graphic design as my career choice and I said, “well, I want to make a lot of money lke you someday.” He laughed as he explained to me that graphic design in not all fun and games. It takes a lot of hard work. No need to explain the details but needless to say, we had a long talk about the amount of “drive, enthusiasm and sacrifice” that it takes to make it in the business.

  • John Pascual

    “ They are the ones you try to convince yourself are naturally more talented then you are when really all they are is someone who loves designs enough to spend the time needed to become great instead of settling for good.”

    If you are majoring in anything in college you have to think that way. When you really love something you’ll be successful at it. In life if everyone settled for just good, nothing would be amazing.

  • Elyssa Coultas

    “You’d rather be surfing myspace during a lecture or presentation or you can’t stop surfing during class breaks.”

    This statement holds true for much of the student population. I’ve walked into the library between classes and seen about half of the students surfing on myspace or facebook, when they could be researching or doing assignments. Even during classes I have seen my fellow classmates on those websites, and even though I hate to admit it, one time I found myself searching the web and signing into myspace.

    This statement really spoke to me because I have done it before, but not anymore.

  • Mark Prather

    “Then make sure your school goals are to LEARN and not just to get a degree.”

    I think this article is more generic than just the graphic design field and while a degree is an awesome choice learning the knowledge is better. On the other hand though only in the arts field do you get a chance to show that you can do something without the formal training. In say business accounting it’s much better to have some sort of formal credentials.

  • Marie Alicea

    “if you’re not excited and happy doing what you’re going to school for, you’re not going to be happy or successful as a professional either”

    I am in the middle of switching fields and have just started VCC studying graphics design. When I first went to college I had decided not to pursue art and graphics, and although I like what I did I always thought why didn’t I go for design. Now I am returning because I always have great ideas for designs but want to learn more about how to express myself on paper.
    So, do what you know you love and enjoy, because if not you will not enjoy your career.

  • Lusk, Michael

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job.”

    I do understand degrees don’t get the job, sometimes it’s who you know, or it takes just throwing yourself out their to be noticed, taking the risk. I can see how it’s a true comment because I do have friends that have established them selves in various companies and/or do freelance work and do well, but only have high school diplomas. I feel getting the degree will give me a little more leverage in some areas in applying with a company, as long as I can back it up what my degree says I am. Also, it is for me to feel acomplished, like I finished something I wanted to go after.

    I’m not just focusing on earning the degree, but where I want to take the degree. How it can maybe open doors that might be shut, because you need to jimmy the lock with this little piece of paper, that’s suppost to represent your knowledge and skills.

  • Maria Calabro

    It is without no doubt passion what I focus on. Passion for ART is what leads to the field you want to explore. We all want to be successful in what we choose to do. If and when we choose graphic design is because it is a tool that helps us define where do we go from here…

    It is my opinion that graphic design helps you focus on those ideas you already have. It gives the tools to take those ideas, develop them in numerous ways and take them into another dimension…

    No, it’s not about greed nor positions… It’s all about the passion within you.

  • Caspar Blattmann

    Oh, and I just can’t resist right now — stop blaming the teacher for your reluctance to learn because that bad habit will get you in a heap of a mess when it comes to one of the most important job skills you could ever hope to have — independent learning beyond what is taught in a classroom.

    After 17 years of working I chose to go back to school. I have seen the truth of this statement over and over again. People who were not willing to change and learn, become eventually less and less important to an employer.

    No matter what industry one is involved in, new technologies and venues create new opportunities that only someone who is not stuck on the past, but is willing to learn new thing, show flexibility and the desire to venture into new territories, can take advantage of.

  • Jihad Canaan

    I do keep looking into other majors that interest me but I really like Graphic Design, although, I’m not a hundred percent sure that’s what I want to do with the rest of my life. And I feel like I’m not as passionate about it as other people, and like I don’t try hard enough. This career takes a lot of work. It is true that you get yourself places, and that it’s not the instructor’s fault that you do poorly in your courses.

  • Leslie Bilger

    “Choosing a major is an important life decision that brings with it peer pressure and other types of obligatory pressure
    (such as the desire to finish what you’ve started) that are often not good enough reasons to continue on the wrong path.
    Make sure you haven’t chosen to be a graphic designer based upon what someone else wants with your life and also
    make sure you haven’t made your decision based upon your need to satisfy societal or other pressures.”

    I totally agree with this sentence. I think choosing is even harder than that.
    Every body knows that when it comes to decide what kind of job you will have in the future, it is one of the most important and scary thing in the world.

    The problem is that everybody seems to know better than you about what you shoulb study and do for a living.

    When I decided to abandon my studies in France to study web design in Florida it was the hardest and most important decision ever. I spoke about this with my family, friends and boyfriend. they gave me advice, they told me what they though about that too. At the end I did what I though was the best for me, I do not regret that at all but sometimes I still wonder if I was right or not.

    My problem (and I’m sure it is the same for a lot of people) is that I wanted everything to be perfect: perfect studies, perfect grades, perfect carreer.
    I had nothing of that, I changed school three times, failed a lot of courses and now I’m starting all over again.
    Now, I know that mistakes is part of life, and that mistakes is not the end of everything. The major I choose in Valencia makes me happy, I love what I learn here and I don’t ask myself so many questions, be cause for me the more I think the less I act.

  • Nathan Nowicki

    “They’re the ones you try to convince yourself are ‘naturally more talented than you are’ when really all they are is someone who loves design enough to spend the time needed to become GREAT instead of settling for GOOD.”

    Nobody famous was ever considered “alright” or “good” …As with everything in life this field requires dedication and commitment. Mix in passion and love for what you do, and you have created the perfect recipe for greatness…

  • Wilkins Delgado

    “If you really loved design enough you would never have a problem finding the time to take your work beyond minimal expectations for class.”

    I chose this line because its extremely down putting. Not all projects are the most interesting and minimal expectations is better than just scrapping it and not doing anything.

  • Katie Schrader

    “Maybe you’re also having a hard time convincing yourself that you should keep trying to read that textbook or project description?”

    I have to admit that this is the most true statement about choosing a major that I have ever read. This is my third major (and fourth college – ugh!) and I finally know that I have made the right choice.

    For once I am actually excited about my classes and I am doing something that I will enjoy and be able to apply to the real world.

    As strange as it might seem, my Economics, Linguistics, and Accounting classes (just to name a few – yawn) were not nearly as stimulating as my current design courses. It is much easier to do well and care if you are genuinely interested in your major.

  • Eliud Acosta

    “It’s not about how much time you have, but how much time you are willing to spend on the things you love”

    I believe this to be a true statement because when working on something that you love, time doesnt matter, that is all irrelevant. If its something that you are passionate about, then you do what you can to work on it because you want to not because you have to.

  • Michael Canning

    “You’d rather be surfing myspace during a lecture or presentation or you can’t stop surfing during class breaks. ”

    First of all, most of us have to spend money to attend college or atleast have finanical help. So anyone who isn’t taking this opportunity is wasting their time and money. Besides myspace isn’t all that, which i don’t know why everyone loves being on it.

    But this article is very good. I personally love graphic desgin because it utilizes things that i love. Which are computers, art, and being creative. So if you dont have your reasons for doing this career, then you need to either find that reason or change careers.

  • Carlos Alvarado

    “Make sure you haven’t chosen to be a graphic designer based upon what someone else wants with your life and also make sure you haven’t made your decision based upon your need to satisfy societal or other pressures. As was mentioned before, and really it doesn’t just apply to being a designer — if you’re not excited and happy doing what you’re going to school for, you’re not going to be happy or successful as a professional either.”

    This line, or rather the whole paragraph really hit home since I’ve been wondering if I’ve chosen the right major to pursue since I began. But it wasn’t for any of the reasons they listed. The last part

    “if you’re not excited and happy doing what you’re going to school for”

    -really made me open my eyes and realize that Graphic Design really might be the major for me, since I switched majors to Graphic Design BECAUSE it really excited me to be knowledgeable in the field.

  • Melissa Cheng

    People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things.

    I think this fact is very true. I know some friends of mine that would carry a camera wherever they go and whenever they think something looks really cool or fascinating, they would take a picture of it and later either blog it or modify it into what they think looks nice or better to them. Sometimes they even use those pictures as resources for art draawings that they might be doing.

  • Halie Coberley

    If you really loved design enough you would never have a problem finding the time to take your work beyond minimal expectations for class.

    I choose this quote from the passage because it is totally true for me. I scored a zero on the passage and ever since I joined the Graphics classes in high school I have been amazed by this major. And from the moment i stepped into my first college graphic class, i knew this was what i wanted to do for a living because i enjoy doing it and it makes me happy. Everyday i practice on the programs to get better at what i do. I have also received many great rewards for my hard work and devotion for this calling.

  • Jeff Haughey

    Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job.

    If there is one thing a student should know about college and degrees, the sentence above sums up four years of hard work. I’ve seen too many people fall into the mindset that once the degree is earned, a job is there waiting. The workplace is extremely competitive and a degree is usually the first requirement for an interview. Everyone who puts in applications and goes to the interview all have the same thing-the degree. It then becomes a matter of how that person got the degree. Was it by: procrastinating and taking the easy way out, or by allocating more time than others for studying, research, and review. An interviewer can quickly decide who really “earned” their degree versus the person who coasted along through college and left with a diploma of some sort.

    Be proactive and go above and beyond what is spelled out for you in your courses. The hard work will pay off with good grades, but also a mindset that will pay huge dividends once you sit down for that important interview and get the job because your better than the average applicant.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/andresmathews/ camilo avila

    Ever since I started college I have been really unsure about majoring in this business or not.This is mainly because I haven’t had that really starting experience where I can experiment with the graphics programs and really get to know it.well I think that since I am taking my first graphics design class this semester. Im sure at the end of this semester I will be sure or not. so far it seems hard but Im sure its gonna be fun and really interesting.

  • Qianli Ma

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job.”

    Before I came to VCC, I often said to myself that I have to get a degree as soon as possible, so that I could use it as a key to apply a job. That was totally wrong. Because the steps what it takes to get the degree is the most important procedure during the whole process. Although you have a degree, even master or doctor, you do not know how to use them, that was just simple no use in the real life. So you have to think over how you could use all the technic to approve that you are good for the job. You approve yourself how good you are. Otherwise, even with your useless degree, it won’t give you a long run in the field.

  • Jonathan Tenjo

    If you’re not excited and happy doing what you’re going to school for, you’re not going to be happy or successful as a professional either.
    Don’t waste your time and money doing something you’re not excited or interested about. If you can’t handle the work load of a GRA class, then you will not survive in the real world. You only live once, so be happy with what your doing.

  • Doug Wise

    “They’re the ones you try to convince yourself are ‘naturally more talented than you are’ when really all they are is someone who loves design enough to spend the time needed to become GREAT instead of settling for GOOD.”

    This is a great point that I think really captures the crux of the post. Furthermore, it’s an idea that seems applicable to just about anything a person sets out to accomplish in life.

    Do you love what you do? If you answer yes to that question, I believe you will find a way to be successful. Certainly, some people are inherently talented when it comes to a particular endeavor. However, those people can have all the talent in the world, but if they don’t have love where their talent lies then eventually they won’t have the drive to succeed when challenges are faced. And no matter how talented we are, we all face challenges.

    So, why should you NOT become a graphic designer? Fundamentally, you should truly love graphics work (doesn’t mean you can’t be frustrated every once-in-awhile), or else happiness and success will be harder to come by.

  • Alice Schumann

    “Make sure you haven’t chosen to be a graphic designer based upon what someone else wants with your life and also make sure you haven’t made your decision based upon your need to satisfy societal or other pressures.”

    I couldn’t agree more with this quote. So many kids are pressured to extremed degrees to go to school. Sometimes parents just want them to go to school for something, it doesn’t matter what as long as they go. Guidance counselors do not even consider a future without college. In reality, college is not for everyone and there are other options.

  • Alex Bennett

    “As was mentioned before, and really it doesn’t just apply to being a designer — if you’re not excited and happy doing what you’re going to school for, you’re not going to be happy or successful as a professional either.”

    That was a difficult thing for me. My parents obviously wanted me to get a degree but the two things I’m interested in (music and design/photography) seem like two things that I don’t need to go to a four year university to pursue with my life. I was really weary of hearing that I can’t do anything in life without a degree. But, when I saw Valencia’s graphics flickr and the work that was coming out of the program, I felt like enrolling in the program would legitimately help me in the field of design. Bottom line, if you’re not passionate about what you’re going to school for and don’t enjoy what you’re working towards, it’s just another chore that no one really wants to do.

  • Joleen A. Yarnell

    “…make sure your school goals are to LEARN and not just to get a degree. No matter what career it is you end up finally choosing, make sure you’re goal is to learn everything you can possibly learn while you have the opportunity…”

    I’ve always thought this…No employer will ask you what your GPA was in college. Quite honestly, all I want to do is learn my whole life; because if you aren’t growing, your dying. :-D

  • Kristi Foreman

    People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things, are constantly reading up on the topic and spend every bit of spare time perfecting their skills.

    This has been me my entire life, but most often when I am travelling. I often pretend its for some other purpose, some project waiting to be constructed. Things like this reassure me that graphic design will not only be new but creative and exciting too!

  • Erica Carrero

    “People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things, are constantly reading up on the topic and spend every bit of spare time perfecting their skills.”

    When I first read this, I had to re-read it again out loud to let my family hear it. It was like you were talking about me. For as long as I can remember, I wouldn’t go anywhere if I didnt have my camera handy because you I never knew what might come around that I needed to capture. I have always been a fan of design even before I knew what it really was. Once I learned that it was something that I could actually get an education in, I was set and I knew that it was exactly what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I was glad when I read the rest of your article and none of the negatives applied to me. Graphic Design is where I’m supposed to be!

  • Soeh Cotto

    Well guess what a “C” really means in this industry — someone who only meets minimal expectations — someone who’s unemployable.

    This is one of my concerns. In my general studies I never achieved anything higher than a C, a B once in a while. But now that I’m taking classes that have to do with my degree and things I enjoy doing I know I’m going to do better in school.

  • Lee Waters

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job. And if you don’t have the strong portfolio, drive, enthusiasm and willingness to sacrifice your time when you’re getting started in the industry your career will go nowhere.”

    I totally agree with this quote. And is the reason I have switched to Valencia, coming from a tech school where they hyped up the “degree” part but left out the “design” part and teaching too. Learning from my mistakes of going to this poor excuse for a design school I now know what it takes to excel and achieve my goals as a graphic designer. (“strong portfolio, drive, enthusiasm and willingness to sacrifice your time when you’re getting started”)

  • http://www.freewebs.com/scavengefang Paige Allen

    “Every designer, art director, creative director in the industry will tell you that being a designer will not make you rich.”

    Each graphic designer starts out small. Rather it be randomly drawing in a sketch book to get ideas and information out of what they would like done in actual art programs such as Adobe’s Photoshop or Illistrator. The whole process of Graphic Design is about grouping images together to create one whole object or design for any industry. Everyone starts off with text and then graduate to bigger levels of the graphics and texts.

    Photoshop is much different than Illustrator or Indesign. The program centers around coloring and customizing graphics and texts together. While in Adobe programs…it revolves around centering and customizing your texts and designs by grouping them together into one blissful image.

    I however learned from just drawing animals and texts for the most of my life. And while learning about Photoshop…i have fully become a better artist and graphic designer by involving new items into my category.

    Learning new things about graphic design is all about learning. You can do so much in such a small amount of time that will Aw everyone.

    Everyone starts out small and graduates to bigger things in life. That is all about life itself.

    Graphic Design was and is still a major part of my life. I have learned so much from going to art classes whether it be in drawing or texting in Photoshop or Illustrator. These things will boost my confidence in life and as a graphic designer.

  • Yessenia Lantigua

    “If you really loved design enough you would never have a problem finding the time to take your work beyond minimal expectations for class.”

    I’ve always found myself not wanting to dedicate extra time to my general studies and my enthusiasm for math or psychology never compared to those of my fellow classmates. I always knew it was because it was never a love nor a passion. I now know that the dedication comes from the love for a subject. I’m actually looking forward to the large work load that will come along with design studies and this time around I am dedicated to putting forth nothing but the best.

  • Joyce Mallon

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job. And if you don’t have the strong portfolio, drive, enthusiasm and willingness to sacrifice your time when you’re getting started in the industry your career will go nowhere.”

    YES! I totally agree with this part! With any career you can’t expect that just because you have a degree in that field from a college, that you will succeed. Showing skill and creativity in your field will show others that you are ready to work. Also, showing that you have a passion for what you’re doing shows the client that you’re not just in it for the money, that you actually do have their company’s best interest in thought.

  • Nick Shirley

    “No more excuses. If you really loved design enough you would never have a problem finding the time to take your work beyond minimal expectations for class.”

    I couldn’t agree to this statement any stronger…It’s not a career unless you love what you do. If you love what you do, everything else should come second. Very true quote.

  • Fernando Murrugarra

    “If your reasons aren’t making a whole lot of sense to you, then change your plan and change your major. ”

    I completely agree with this statement mainly due to the fact that i couldn’t make up my mind between game design and computer animation and eventually the reasons to stay in game design weren’t enough to make me stay in it. Thus, i chose a similar but better major!

  • Joyce Mallon

    “Make sure you haven’t chosen to be a graphic designer based upon what someone else wants with your life and also make sure you haven’t made your decision based upon your need to satisfy societal or other pressures.”

    I chose to major in graphic design when I noticed that I would love looking at photographs, logos, designs, shirts, almost anything in print! I definitely agree that you should follow what interests you and study that in school. Luckily my parents support me in my decision to study graphic design. None of my friends are studying this field, so I am absolutely not doing it under pressures. I’m glad that I have found something that I really enjoy to work and learn on.

  • “L” Rosa

    haha I’m guilty about the Myspace thing. Well, not strictly, but anything else that catches my interest more than an actual lecture. I find myself getting rather bored when people talk about this sort of thing. I’m more of a visual sort of person, therefore, anything I can read or have a hands on interaction with is more likely to catch my attention (i.e.: An article, tutorial, and maybe an email from my bf XD I won’t deny it).
    But it doesn’t mean that I’m not serious about my future career in graphic arts. I -WILL- become a manga artist one day, whether people think I take this seriously or not. ^_~

  • http://masterskadu.deviantart.com/ Jasper Stephens

    I think one of the problem is as a person who is majoring in Graphic Design they lack interaction. The person needs something to do rather then listen to a lecture all the time. Me I can’t sit and listen to a lecture with out doing something. If its writing notes, drawing, or tapping my feet. I got to do something or I might end up falling asleep in the class.

  • Chel-C Moody

    “You shouldn’t have to try so hard to find something about graphic design that you’re interested in enough to let go of the myspace and dig, really dig, into graphic design on a deeper level.”

    I agree with this statement. If you cant get away from myspace for and hour or however long your class is because you cant find a reason to focus and pay attention then how can you keep a career and continue on with your education in this field.

    Don’t get me wrong I’m also always on myspace when I’m at home and have nothing better to do but I’m not addicted like the hundreds of thousands out there. I just think myspace is for home not for class.

  • Desiree Pirela

    Well, I really like graphics, that’s why I chose this major, but in something I agree. I am not 100 percent sure that this is what I want, I need to be IN there and practice by myself to make sure. What I am looking for is something that gets all my attention and I think that at the end of the semester I will make a final decision.

  • Lori Paschal

    “People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things …”

    I’ve started keeping a note pad next to my chair when I watch TV. I love to watch craft and home decorating shows in my spare time, and writing down the information or making a sketch makes things easier to remember later.

  • Veronica Perez

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job.”

    Finally! I don’t know how many times I have told this to my friends, but I’m glad someone else has pointed it out. Just because you have a degree does not mean that you are an amazing designer; you just have the knowledge and education to become one.

  • Steven Conrado

    “You shouldn’t have to try so hard to find something about graphic design that you’re interested in ”

    I couldn’t agree more. If you are not passionate about art and graphic design then maybe you shouldn’t be majoring in it.

  • Plinio Tejeda

    They’re the ones you try to convince yourself are ‘naturally more talented than you are’ when really all they are is someone who loves design enough to spend the time needed to become GREAT instead of settling for GOOD.

    This is defenately true when having a creative mind, to be great at something one cannot satisfy for the minimum, but must push for that extra bit of time to perfect your work!

    My reaction towards all of this, is that no matter what one chooses its career goals if you’re not willing to go all the way then do not expect the best to come out.

  • Lisa Lauttenbach

    “They’re the ones you try to convince yourself are ‘naturally more talented than you are’ when really all they are is someone who loves design enough to spend the time needed to become GREAT instead of settling for GOOD.”

    This is so true. Allowing your mind to discourage itself will definitely keep you from creating great work.

    I believe this excerpt is extremely important. You must constantly push yourself to the limit to make it in this business.

  • Cyndi Boggs

    “If you really loved design enough you would never have a problem finding the time to take your work beyond minimal expectations for class.”

    This statement is so true. I know as an artist I can be kinda hard on myself and work and work on a project. If you are trying to make this a career are you really gonna hand in less than amazing work to a client? I think if you truly love what you do you won’t put it off and you will hand in nothing but your best.

  • camilo avila

    “Want to get set on the right foot starting today? Then make sure your school goals are to LEARN and not just to get a degree”.

    I chose this excerpt because my goal in fact it is to learn as much as I can because design is something that really like and I would really enjoy learning it.

  • kristin budesa

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job.“

    I believe this statement to be true, because the establishment you earn a degree from, the amount of schooling or the cost of your education can’t replace the drive, talent and portfolio needed to succeed in the industry. A fancy degree may land you the job, but only you can keep it.

  • Stephen Carey

    A Graphic design degree may look easy for most, but its hard when your a designer trying to find the next best design to wow your audience. Its not for the people that get bored easily and like to surf the web during class. As a fellow designer, I sometimes feel annoyed with people who are taking the class as just an elective course because it seems they do not have the drive to learn everything they can out of the courses for graphic designers. There is tons of talent coming out everyday! YOU HAVE TO BE NOTICED FOR YOU AND THE ALL HARD WORK YOU HAVE ACCOMPLISHED.

  • kevin Mccrystal

    It’s not about how much time you have, but how much time you’re willing to spend on the things you love.

    I used this excerpt because it is true to real life. When you love something you give all your time to it.
    When I first read this excerpt I started to think all the things i love and give my time too.

  • Alison Toro

    Then make sure your school goals are to LEARN and not just to get a degree.

    This is the case with many people. Everyone gets caught up with how much money that you can make in a certain field that you forget to make sure its something you can enjoy doing every day for 8 hours or more.

  • Jade Lawhon

    “People who really love design carry things like sketchbooks or cameras around with them just waiting to be inspired by mundane things”

    Agree and Disagree. Yes I could sketch or just come up with things for hours. Things that make sense, things that are just simply off. I make this with my hands constantly and most of the time this has to do with colors acyrilcs. Or just a pencil, but I’m not “waiting” to be inspired. I find my insperation with the things I do. Waiting just makes my impatient and slower with my work.

  • Thanpisith Chanakul

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job.”

    I’m fifty fifty with the statement. Degrees at time assist people by broadening the different types of jobs that person can acquire. On the other hand, some fields at some jobs do not require a degree background in that specific area of expertise! So, it’s okay if you don’t have a degree, but it’s much better if you do. At least that’s what I believe, sort of!?!?!?

  • Linda Poiesz

    “you’re not excited enough to stay up late and sacrifice playtime beyond what is being asked of you for assignments, then it’s time you stopped claiming to love design”

    This statement really resonates with me because I am one of those students that has changed majors multiple times. I picked other majors believing that as classes went on I would begin to love the subject matter more, but that is not what I discovered. I was still as detached as I was during the into classes, and this is why I decided to take some extra time to try and discover what I really love. In beginning Intro to Graphic Design, I can honestly say there has never been a syllabus that I have read and gotten a bigger and bigger smile from reading!

  • http://100poundsofgood.com JOEY WERNER aka JOS.A

    They’re the ones you try to convince yourself are ‘naturally more talented than you are’ when really all they are is someone who loves design enough to spend the time needed to become GREAT instead of settling for GOOD.”

    This was an interesting sentence to me because as an artist I believe true artists have natural talents which no matter what amount of practice or work is performed by others can never match natural born talent. I think that naturally being able to do design and create creatively are they difference between “GOOD” and “GREAT”. I believe talents must be honed and skills must be learned through real world experience, but I think nothing can replace the natural gifts some of us just ended up being born with.

  • Steven Yu

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job.“

    I strongly agree with this statement as a degree is only a simple piece of paper, it does not say weather you are a well mannered person, how well you design, nor how creative you are. A degree to me is a minor step to having a Graphic design job.

  • Keren Kuilan

    “If you’re not excited enough to stay up late and sacrifice playtime beyond what is being asked of you for assignments, then it’s time you stopped claiming to love design.”

    I think this applies to any major, and I couldn’t agree more. I wasted two years of my life in a biology major trying to convince myself that it was what I truly wanted. I forced myself to go to class telling myself that I needed it to be successful. Then one day I woke up and realized that I hated it! I switched to the Arts and I haven’t looked back. Sure I may not be rich, but at least I’ll be happy.

  • Elias R

    Well most everyone here seems to be roughly on the same page. These 5 points, or signs i should say definitely make sense. If you dont have the love or passion for this it probably isn’t for you. Anything you choose to do in life you have to be sure about one thing and that one thing is that you must feel that you sleep, eat, dream, BE whatever it is you want to do in life regardless if its a designer or a doctor. If you live it and love it you will be it and do it. i hope im making some sense here. Iv had a pretty bumpy road since i have started at valencia but i have realized exactly what it is i want and know how im going to get it. it may sound very cliche but i never felt this phrase to be so true as i do now. “Success is a journey not a destination”. and “Success is when preparation meets oportunity”.

  • Jason Byrd

    The moment I read this I knew it was a ploy to get me to think that I don’t have what it takes to be a Graphic Designer. The topic of discussion described me in perfection when I was younger. This is the year for determination. This year, I take a leap forward and discover more. The wealthiest people in the world are not those with the money or the fancy cars, it’s those that are happy with themselves and their lives. You can’t receive anything great without sweating at all; you have to work hard. A weight lifter can’t walk in to a gym and automatically bench 350 lbs. It takes time, knowledge, determination, and patience. I will only be rich when I am happy with what I am doing. It is time to focus and make this life mine; in which, what I want to be. Just to recap, that was me long ago even if it was yesterday, but this is me today… I am Determination! I’m a Graphic Designer! Let get it on!!!

  • http://www.myspace.com/simoneymcfly Si Rajadhyax

    Personally I think this post should be something given to you if you’re deciding to enter a major in Graphic Design. I mean these are genuinely important things to consider if you’re thinking about entering this profession. A lot of times you here people saying this is going to make me a quick buck upon graduation. If that’s what one’s really thinking, then in essence you’re taking the art out of it. Designers worked hard to get people to even consider Graphic Design as a true Art. According to my Professor, Graphic Designers were called Commercial Artists in the 70′s, and were hated on. So in conclusion, i feel Graphic Design should be taken seriously because of the skills needed to be successful at it, but not too seriously.

  • Rosalba Maldonado

    “It’s not about how much time you have, but how much time you’re willing to spend on the things you love”

    I couldn’t agreed more with this excerpt. To do something well you have to like it. But it’s not enough just to tell people that. Doing what you love is complicated. Once you find something interesting, pursue it.

  • James McComb

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job. And if you don’t have the strong portfolio, drive, enthusiasm and willingness to sacrifice your time when you’re getting started in the industry your career will go nowhere.”

    This statement really agrees with me, it takes effort mixed with time and skill to make a really successful graphic artist and that is something to work for.

  • http://wwww.myspace.com/Sonacitypro Michael Fried

    “It’s not about how much time you have, but how much time you’re willing to spend on the things you love.”

    I couldnt agree more with this statement. If you love doing something, then you will enjoy doing it and spend more time perfecting it. People will notice the good job you have done and if it is graphics, hopefully hire you one day for work.

    This was a great blog, it’s all about the common sense people don’t have. Someone just had to put it out there. Nice work

  • Llay’n M.

    “They’re the ones you try to convince yourself are ‘naturally more talented than you are’ when really all they are is someone who loves design enough to spend the time needed to become GREAT instead of settling for GOOD.”

    I chose this because I feel sometimes I use the same excuse when I see others doing things I wish I could do, when really I could if I practiced enough as well.
    My reaction to this sentence triggered something in my mind that I always knew, but I guess I just needed it to be told to me in order for me to truly understand its meaning.

  • Llay’n M.

    “They’re the ones you try to convince yourself are ‘naturally more talented than you are’ when really all they are is someone who loves design enough to spend the time needed to become GREAT instead of settling for GOOD.”

    I chose this sentence because I feel it is very true. Many of us think others are more talented than us because they might be advanced. My reaction to this triggered something in my mind that I always knew was true, but I suppose I just needed it to be told to me.

  • Berlinda “Nina-B” Graves

    Finally, something right up my ally. I agree with just about everyone on here. Never chose design to get rich. I chose it because it is something that I love to do. Why not get paid for something that I love and for it to be something that is natural. I have the disease too. I keep packaging like cds, gum packs, flyers, anything I think worthy of cool and sets off ideas in my brain.

    To me, it may be hard at times and even frustrating, but at the end of the day we have the coolest job on the planet.

  • Brian Zarajczyk

    “Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job. And if you don’t have the strong portfolio, drive, enthusiasm and willingness to sacrifice your time when you’re getting started in the industry your career will go nowhere.”

    Yes, there a lot of people I’ve known who slacked off or didn’t do all the work they should have, but somehow made it through a program and graduated. They have the Degree, but aren’t very good at what they do, or sometimes cannot even perform some of the most basic functions of that job.

  • Wyatt Holland

    I have the same aknowledgement as Brain from above…. Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job. And if you don’t have the strong portfolio, drive, enthusiasm and willingness to sacrifice your time when you’re getting started in the industry your career will go nowhere.”

    It’s such a strong knowledge base that every one needs. It is just such a plain and simply listed phrase, but so powerful. If you cannot abide by this rule as a college graduate or pursuor you need to check yourself at the front door! This is easily the best part of the blog.

  • Chyna Vinsant

    I agree with this. Graphic Design , actually art in general , shouldn’t be something that you get into to make a lot of money . Nor is it something you get into because your friend decided to enroll in the course . Art is a passion , a gift . If you don’t have that passion and gift you’re not going to enjoy studying it and , quite frankly , your work won’t be as good as the work of those who actually want this . You can learn the technical aspects of art , you can learn the methods , but if it’s not in you — it will always lack that something . If you’ve enrolled in this course and have now come to realize that this isn’t what you want , then find what you really have a passion for and go for that. However , if you’re like me and this is what you want , then give it all you’ve got and don’t give up ! I love art and I can’t wait to see how much my work will progress with each new thing I learn.

  • chezar salustro

    I have seen this over and over again. People who don’t think, they want to be there but really they just take up space from someone who wants to be there. This is not high school. I don’t think it’s right.

    This isn’t my first year of college and I actually finished early in my first program because I wanted to be there and was into what the program was offering and because of that it didn’t feel like I was doing work or something I didn’t want to do. I wanted to be there and learn all that my teacher had to offer and it really paid off in the end. I believe that if you wouldn’t do this kind of work for free you need to find something you will and pick that for a job, because a job is more than just work its something you have to love to or it won’t be much of a job for long

  • amy

    hey there everybody. so i am currently deciding on what i want to do for the rest of my life and i think that graphic design is something that i would love because i am into the artsy side of the world. Im a great photographer and an ok drawer and i love photoshop and all those elements of editing, i love to make things beautiful. I was wondering what careers exactly follow up with graphic design and what youre exactly supposed to major in, whether it be art or actually graphic design. Please help! and thans!

  • Aimee Montes

    I found this post to be very interesting and true. I chose a graphic design major because I love art and computers. I thought graphic design was the perfect combination of those two things. Right now, I am still in the phase where I am unsure if I’ll be successful in the design industry. It is necessary to take a couple courses in the field to see if you are interested in pursuing the degree.

    For the most part, I stay concentrated on the lectures in class but it is hard to give the teacher my full attention for 3 hours. I do understand that if I don’t pay attention I am the one that will regret it later because I need to know the information not just to pass the class or the assignment but to be successful in my career. Money was not a major factor in picking graphic design because if this doesn’t work out I will probably be a teacher. I can’t see myself having a career where I can’t be creative. It may frustrate me from time to time but its worth it.

  • Andrea Bejarano

    I am not, nor I intent to be a Graphic Design Major. I am currently taking this class because it is a very helpful tool for my Sports Marketing Major. I was in Graphic Design classes all through high school and all we used was InDesign and I loved it, I became one of the best in my class and was asked to create a coupon for the athletics department. This coupon is still being used today….
    Once in college, I took two photography classes and I learned how to use Photoshop. With this, I have been able to take action photographs of football games and other spots.
    This class has enabled me to better my knowledge in these Adobe programs and others I had not used prior to the class, such as Adobe Illustrator.
    I agree with Kristy when she says that when you have a passion for something you go the extra mile and you are not content with a “C”. Also, when you have a passion for something, you MAKE time to work on projects and make MORE time to make them even better.
    I also believe that choosing a major for the money will become boring after a while. Think about it, at first, the money you [might] make is your motivation, but once you realize what your doing is not something you are interested in or happy doing… why waste the time??
    In my opinion, Graphic Design Major is a fun yet challenging major, however if you don’t have the time or don’t have the enthusiasm ALL THE TIME, you should change majors, maybe a major that will implement Graphic Design tools?
    This is a class where you are “in it to win it” or might find out you are not that interested in the major at all! But it’s good to ask yourself these questions to prevent future changes that might make you start from zero with a NEW major.
    Time and passion for this major are key elements for a successful career, but if you don’t have these, you might want to look into other majors.
    I like this class and I can’t wait for football season to start so I can apply everything I have learned in this class! :)

  • http://www.developerworks.net Emmanuel Garcia

    Getting a grade other than an A, doesn’t necessarily mean that you cannot make it in the graphic design world, specially if you are a freelancer or independent designer. However, poor study habits may keep you from those good grades instead of just not liking graphic design. Many people think of graphic design career as being able to make something that looks nice and difficult make using a computer. But it involves a lot more things. Time management skills, planning, organization, and creativity are just some of the necessary tools to be a good designer. Software usage proficiency can be easily acquired and needs to be kept fresh with new program versions and features. Meanwhile, good practices and professional development take time and experience and usually do not get outdated over the time.
    Even thought some of these signs apply to me, I am willing to grow a positive attitude in myself that will help me in my career success. Being a good graphic designer means drinking coffee at 3 am. Being a computer programmer, web developer, network engineer, and graphic designer at the same time, is a lot more fun :-)

  • Eugene Tunaya

    This definitely is a helpful post. Before changing my major to Graphic Design, I was originally heading towards the field of Computer Science/Electrical Engineer. I was gung ho about it all through out high school, this changed within the first year or two of attending college. At times I would find myself not doing what I should have, just because I had other thoughts on my mind, and those other thoughts were graphic design. Even before I declared my major as Graphic Design, I started learning and experimenting on my own, just because it was interesting to me.

    It was just a hobby of mine, and I would spend every minute of it on my spare time. I don’t plan on being rich from this, I think it would be better for me in the future and a freelance designer, because I have other things that occupy my time as well. If I were to freelance, I’d have more free time, at least I believe. Not only do I stay up playing around with the tools in the programs, I look up tutorials on youtube how to do certain things.

    Ever since I’ve changed my major to graphic design, I’m always excited to go to class, and learn, as nerdy as that sounds [:

  • Samantha A. Morales

    This is all so true Kristy. And the whole money making part is on point. It will make you money eventually but that’s with due time and practice. Like you said it’s like being in love

  • nicholas ortiz

    I would give myself half a point for the whole web surfing deal during some lectures. Yes it shouldn’t be done during lectures but i get some graphic inspiration from the dumb posts people put on facebook. People post the most ridiculous things that can give you inspiration on your work. I am a professional Dj but I design club flyers for the venues I play at. Hearing some posts from club goers on facebook saying things that happen on nights they go clubbing such as “hanging out at the bar with a hot bartender”, would get me thinking of images in putting into my flyer design of maybe a female bartender serving a guy with a big smile on his face. It can be bad to surf on the web during class but if you can multitask, the little things you find online can inspire towards design and creative thinking.

  • Samantha A. Morales

    If you go on Facebook to talk with your friends than yes it’s dumb but facebook is actually great networking. Surfing the web is the most resourveful place for inspiration. I don’t think people really worry about should they major in graphic design it’s more of “will i be as good as some or will i fail?” This is a question i think everyone comes across that. It is a very intimidating field but a reminder that you love what you do. You can get inspiration from anywhere even if the source is unfamiliar. Design is everywhere.

  • Christian Cevallos

    I think that it is true when it says, that it is US who get the job and not the major we might have because personal attitudes, capabilities, and drive are what makes the difference from “the graphic designer” and “THE GRAPHIC DESIGNER.”

  • Diane Thompson

    I am an older student looking for another career that I can develop into my own business. But I realize that it takes a lot of passion, dedication and commitment to do anything well. I was answering questions regarding TVCA, and I realized that I fall short in almost every area but the desire. Desire is just not enough. This article just confirmed that I do not have a true commitment to the program, although I have a lot of passion. I think I am afraid because I lack the natural talent (mostly computer experience) I see in a lot of students in my classes. But I also see them lacking in some areas, mainly discipline. That, I do have and so I am going to try to use that discipline to develop the areas in which I am weak and hopefully I can manifest all my wonderful ideas.

  • Ekaterina Bagicheva

    OK, I totally understand everything. But here something that I would like to tell you. I want to add that it is hard anywhere, retail, food, hospitality, medical field, etc. and it is important to proof yourself anywhere. Work your as off, have some energy. I would never hire a none enthusiastic person, so think as a business owner, who would you want to have as your employ. This life is a pure competition. But, if you feel that you do not like to compete then quit now, and “go to Tibet and meditate”, and be happy. Do what makes you happy since it is your life. But do not quit after 100 disappointments; patience is everything at business and in personal life. Hay, I hope this will pump you up.

  • EdwardJH

    This major is not a choice of convenience for me. It’s not so much what I’d prefer or a means to make money, what I think will be easy or challenging. I could care less what the industry thinks of my grades. In the end it will be my work that sets me apart.

    I’m in this industry/major to learn to render my minds images. Something I can’t flush out with pen paper and or pastels. The stories, landscapes, characters, and expressions which need motion and depth my feeble hands simply can’t render on their own. I need this more then I want this and I want it more then I can appropriately express with simple words.

  • Sarah Gonzalez

    I’m not majoring in Graphic Design but this article really makes me think about choosing a major you’re passionate about and not just because you think it will make you a lot of money. I’m taking Graphic Arts mostly for fun but I’m majoring in Political Science because I love politics, discussing and want to make a change in the world with my opinions. I think these reasons to be a graphic designer apply to any other major and career you choose in your life. This really helped me realize that I’m going to do so well in what I study because I want to wake up every morning and go that U.S. Government class and seek farther into my opinions and arguments. I say to those who want to do Graphic Design to really take in consideration this article. Its very helpful.

  • Michelle Westmoreland

    I feel like when you major in something you should have a love for it and be passionate. Don’t think about the money that Graphic Design will make compared to other careers (ex:Doctors)! I think if you think of yourself as being the best and put your time and effort into what you love to do, the money will come right along with it, no matter the career choice! I just think some people may choose certain careers only because of the money that it makes! That’s why you should take heed of all your talents and loves and put them into play! For Graphic Design, if you love art, pictures and making more of a picture and you find yourself messing in these things daily it my be for you! It’s all about using your gift and making sure your passionate about the gifts you have!

  • sean murtha

    I totally agree with the point you have to love graphic arts to work in this field. Some people seem to think that because they know their way around Photoshop and illustrator they can just jump right into freelance work. This is not true, it takes a knowledge of many different subject including but not limited to geometry ,typography and even to some degree physiology to understand have your designs work as a whole and how they affect you audience. Furthermore to really accomplish the desired effects of a design it takes hour of sitting in front of a computer tweaking your creation to the proper form. I dont honestly think anyone without a love for the art could do that. Also the point about money is a valid one. They did not coin the phrase ” starving artist ” for nothing. One should never do this for the money. The only reason to do this career is because you want to bring your ideas and dream in to plain view for the world to see. it seem silly that by designing a simple logo or business card you can influence the world but its true, it not the art it self that is important it is what the art represents and that is it is a window to the human soul. but not just any soul your soul.

  • Jovan L Fonseca

    I couldn’t agree more with the five signs listed!

    After graduating from high school, I thought I wanted to be a Paramedic. I was just going to college for a degree not because I loved the career. I thought it was a great choice but failed to do my research with this job. So I took a long break from school to REALLY think of what I wanted to do with my life and saw that my sister was taking up some classes for graphic design. This got me interested as I already paint and draw. I researched the field, found out what a Graphic designer does and what the career entails. I loved it. Pay does range but with the skill, determination and the right attitude I know I WILL be happy and make this a career I will enjoy.

    Anyhow isn’t that what really matters? Who wants to have a job that they hate?

  • mike sir

    I think this was an amazing article and there should be one posted for every major somewhere on atlas. As an individual that is attempting college for the second time i can personally say that i have had this problem with many past possible majors. there are many things that are great hobbies and even great talents but to decide what to do as a profession is completely different. you have to really decide if that is something you can do for the rest of your life. your choice has to be a personal passion and resources like this are great for helping lost souls.

  • Valerie Marquez

    This article is very true. The saddest thing to me is wasted time. Life is too short to be wasting time forcing yourself to do something for all the wrong reasons. I ABSOLUTELY agree, if you can answer yes to most of these questions, then you really need to re-evaluate your reason for being in Graphic Design, or college for that matter.

  • Esther Ruiz

    This is an excellent article to question the path one is taking especially in graphic design. There are so many things to learn in this program and it would be a shame to miss a vital part because you are bore or rather be doing something else instead of being in class. It takes a lot of discipline and commitment to go to college period. You owe it to yourself to believe in yourself and pursue your interests especially if it pertains to design. I find taking a class a semester suits me because I work full-time and I don’t want to feel overwhelmed and/or “cheated” of a learning experience because I’m eager to get my degree. It’s taken me this long to get back into college. I want to graduate knowing I have learned something much greater than I would have imagine I could do. I look forward in the inspirations and knowledge this program has to offer.

  • Pingback: · 5 señales que indican que no deberías estudiar Diseño Gráfico ·

  • Wilfredo Garcia

    This article is an excellent reality check for those hip deep in their studies, regardless of their degree. I wholeheartedly agree with the emphasis on working hard, being dedicated, and realizing that it is not the degree, but the person that earns ‘it’, that are the most important. I believe that these are concepts that should drilled into the minds of students in high school.

    I have often found that students in every generation are quick to expect that they be given everything with only the barest effort. Of course these misconceptions seem to be passed down from one generation to the next. People see a college degree as an ultimate goal because the concept of school is, “Ok, I got through this grade, only so many more to go. As long as I pass high school, I’ll be ok.” They see schooling, or to be more accurate, learning as steps to be taken in a time frame, when truly, learning should never end; it should never become stagnant. Stagnation is an end…a self-imposed end.

    On a side note, the one issue that I believe this article doesn’t take into consideration is the idea that sometimes we must try something…experience it…in order to truly know if it is the path on which we belong. So long as a student puts forth 100% effort and then some, that student can even turn a trip down an errant path and turn it into a point of strength and positive learning.

  • Lauren Vieira

    I agree with this article 100%. Graphic design is a heck of a commitment, and you have to be genuinely interested in becoming a designer. To create something original and creative, you need drive and enthusiasm behind your work, or else it will only meet the “minimum requirements”. I also think that to successfully obtain a graphic design degree you must be able to work hours on end on the same project, perfecting it. Although this article explains a lot of truth in majoring in graphic design, I feel that it does not consider the fact that one may just try out graphic design as a major and naturally do very well at it, or develop a love for the art. Not everyone knows exactly what they want to do and graphic design is a great field of study to try out, even though it takes commitment and a lot of hard work, but then again, what fields don’t require hard work and determination?

  • lindsaycolbert

    I think the most interesting aspect of this article is the comments. It’s amazing to her other people opinions about design and who is really cut out for it. I started my college studies in marine biology, which is obviously on the other side of the spectrum. Realizing it wasn’t for me, i decided to study fine art. It had always been a passion of mine, and something I didnt realize I was actually good at, until I put the time and effort into it. I really believe that you can achieve any goal with hard work and a desire to succeed, but at the same time some people just are not cut out for this industry. Some people are just not meant to be designers. Every second of free time I have I spend looking at other designs, drawing, and perfecting my skills. Like stated in the article, this can take your from good to great, and even better. The world is design is so large, and it never stops. That is why I enjoy it so much, the limit is endless.

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    well if you have passion to do something you will do it. just be sincere and diligent. just understand the basic of the field which you have chosen and give your best.

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  • Isabel Nieves

    This article is pretty straight forward and kind of makes me realize that if I really want to be serious in graphic arts, then I need just really need to be SERIOUS about it. I am a newbie to this program and have been interested in arts and designing ever since so I thought this program would be good for me. One can not dilly dally online while in class as mention in the article. I have seen some people in my class surf online besides actually doing their assignments which kind of bewilders me why they are there in the first place. I mean you are paying for the course don’t waste your money and time on things that you can do at home.
    Also, as mentioned in the article, going into a field for the money and not for actually enjoying it really won’t get you anywhere. Money should be part of the initiative to become a graphic artist, but not the main reason. All in all, do something you know you love and you will most likely succeed.

  • Jorge Felton

    I’m really glad you posted this and I’m sure this is what i really want to do and this has only reassured me of that. =]

  • Leah Luhta

    I feel like the Graphic Design Essentials class is perfect for someone who is unsure if graphic design is the route they want to go. It doesn’t get too in depth, but does just enough for someone to get an idea of what the industry is all about.

  • Javed Ally

    I think this post should be something given to you if you’re deciding to enter a major in Graphic Design. Degrees don’t get you the job, YOU get you the job. I wholeheartedly agree with the emphasis on working hard and being dedicated. I feel like the Graphic Design Essentials class is perfect for someone who is unsure if graphic design is the route they want to go. Learning new things about graphic design is all about learning. You can do so much in such a small amount of time that will Aw everyone. If your not willing to put in the time then this isnt the course for you. You must constantly push yourself to the limit to make it in this business.

  • Danielle Watson

    The title of this entry had me curious, and I am really glad that I read it. I have come a long way since I first started college and gone through a few different majors. I wish I would have read this when I was first starting out, but now it has just affirmed what I have come to find out over the past few years. I really liked the point about your bad grades reflecting that maybe you just aren’t interested enough to put in the time. It is so true. I was in a major that most consider easy and I couldn’t figure out why I was getting bad grades. The reason was, I was BORED OUT OF MY MIND. I know that graphic design is going to take a lot of time and effort but I cannot wait!

  • Hugo Ramos

    The skill of design is a very exclusive art. in a sense, It is not your average mundane career but a hobby and pastime in and of itself. In addition, those who have a lifelong experience in creating and admiring great works of art have the enthusiastic drive that is extremely necassary in such a competitive field. I feel for what the writer , kpennino is saying an
    d i find this article very useful in a limited sense to those who question their future in graphic design. Needless to say, thorough research and discovery into the career path is crucial for the individual . (auditory, visual, and kinesthetic) For purpose of reassuring. On that note, very down to earth article
    by kpennino

  • Virginia Arkelian

    I strongly agree with this post, this is an excellent article for all who are out there having doubts about becoming a graphic artist.
    Graphic design is a very competitive field. Designers are often faced with tight deadlines, long working hours, and demanding clients.
    In order to become a successful designer, you have to love what you are doing.
    You have to have the patience to sit down with clients and be able to listen and understand their needs and grow your relationship so that your ideas meet their expectations.
    Moreover, technology is rapidly changing around us, keeping up is crucial to succeed. Designers are expected to be up to date with the latest programs and software and have to always come up with new creative ideas.
    As a result, if someone doesn’t have enough enthusiasm, commitment, and passion about designing and creating, then he/she should look elsewhere.

  • Sarah Kennedy

    After receiving a bachelor’s degree from a big state college, I wonder if I should have applied these thoughts to the major I chose then. Maybe I would have changed to Graphic Design if I had time to explore more majors. I’ve spent 4 years repaying student loans for that major, which I spent most of my class time doing crossword puzzles. It’s a shame to spend money getting an education that you don’t even like or use. Sometimes I think its a bad idea to go straight from high school to college, without working at a job and learning more about what you like to do. Studying something and working at a job in that field are sometimes wildly different experiences. I’m glad that this program fits the classes to the work environment. It gives you a much better idea if the graphic design job is a fit for your personality and skill set.

  • Chelsea Chen

    If these five signs apply to you whether or not your major is graphic design, you should be reconsidering a different direction, because in the end, its all about doing something you love. I have witnessed first hand the personal sacrifices a graphic designer has to make in order to come out on top. Being a woman in this industry means working a full-time job and giving it your all or choosing to put your career on hold for family life. Some women can juggle both, but there is a reason why most executive positions are still held by men; despite the shattering of many glass ceilings. Women have more to sacrifice and it is difficult to break free from traditional gender roles in order to pursue a career.
    Working hard comes with its rewards, but sacrifices mean nothing if there is no heart, no passion in the work that you do. Graphic design is similar to other fields in art, because it reflects a message to the audience using the graphic artist as a medium. It is clear when there is no passion in the artist, because it is clearly reflected in the work. All the greats have varied in style, but the one thing that ties them together is their love for what they do.

  • Cheyanne Green

    Some of these signs apply to me, and it frustrates me. I love creating things, and being able to tell people that yes, I made that, and that I am very proud of my work. My problem is, I just do not have any idea what I would like to do in the art field. I know that there are many opportunities in the field, but I haven’t found the one that best fits me just yet. I was hoping that taking a Graphic Design class would help me finally decide what I wanted to do in this field. And yes, maybe I am just jumping to conclusion, because I am really good about doing so. I also have really bad self esteem issues when it comes to my work, I will ALWAYS find something wrong with it, but that is why I will stick it out through this semester in this class because I know I have the potential to do great things in this field; it is just a matter of if I am willing to see this potential, and if I am willing to put in the effort and time to be great.

  • Van Syses Lewis Jr

    I can honestly say that it makes me happy to read this. I too often end up in a design class and have to deal with those who think it’s just a easy class they can fool around in. It upsets me that others use a time I spend indulging in a passion of mind to waste their lives making nothing out of themselves. But on the other hand, this is very good advice and an eye opener for those who do want to be major in Graphic Design but find themselves doing the very things in this article. Let this become a reason to change your habits in reference to your current career path if you truly want to stick it out. It makes me feel good that someone is hoping to remove those who don’t want to put in the effort to succeed as a Graphic Designer, or enlighten those who do but aren’t putting in the full effort towards it. It’s honest advice that no job is easy to advance and succeed in, but it’s also true that those who put that fight in to succeed find it easier than those who don’t take this path seriously. I joke around like anyone else, but I’m not one to run from hard work when in need to buckle down and get the job done and give it my all.

  • Chassidy Stinson

    I was first a little skeptical about reading this post. but now I am pretty happy that I have read it. It makes me more confident that I am seeking the right degree. I have always been very dedicated to designing. Before college I use to stay up throughout the night working on websites and new designs for friends family and some others. It definitely was not easy but it is something that I love doing. I can say that usually when I am taking a class where the computers are available, I do surf the web and do whatever I can to entertain myself. But in my graphics essential class i find myself doing the opposite.

  • Toni

    I’m glad that I read this article because it makes me think really hard whether or not I want to major in graphic design. Sure, I do love graphic designing, using photoshop, drawing, teaching myself how to use the Adobe software programs (Illustrator, Dreamweaver, etc) but in the end, it will always be just a hobby. But who knows, I’m studying to be a school teacher and there are graphic design teachers in high school. Maybe I’ll be one of those people in the future. I love graphic design and I want to learn more about it, get more skilled and have lots of knowledge.

  • Adrian H

    I like this article because it is simple but it get a very clear message across. I believe that it tells the reader some things that they might do without even knowing it which could affect their work as a designer. A lot of these thing are everyday things that we do such as Facebook or play games but this article shows us that when doing these things at the same time as designing it can majorly effect your work.

  • Kassandra Logan

    I thought this article was especially helpful to me. I am a junior now and just recently decided on this line of work. I love to doodle and draw whenever I can but I never really thought anything of it. I have been questioning myself on whether or not I should choose this as a career. After reading this post though I feel that I can actually make this my career and fall in love with it. I love making things look good and I love the pride that comes along with that. I am a really good student when I do focus and I love what im doing…it just takes me forever to decide on certain things. When I did choose this and I actually started taking classes in it I found that I was more comfortable and happy then I was in any of my other classes.

  • Yuyu Adi Khemist

    Yuhai Chung- I believe this article was helpful for me.
    But at the same time in some aspect I do disagree. Most of these suggestions why
    you should not major in graphics design are true. I do not think reading about
    other majors of interest would affect a intuition for doing this class. I
    believe you should have open options and an open mind. My view on this post is
    that an individual can multitask and even choose more than one thing to do with
    their lives. Don’t restrict yourselves to what people think your good enough
    for. Good enough is not enough. I for one could not be comfortable with just
    good enough. Otherwise this was a very truthful and mind boggling insert which
    makes you really way your options.

  • Stephanie Hott

    Stephanie Hott- This article could apply to other majors as well as to graphic design. If you find that your attention span is low in class and that you’re not putting in extra effort outside of class, then that major may not be for you. It’s always good to keep an open mind when thinking about the options for a major. It’s better to take your time when choosing a major. I feel a large majority of new students suffer from this problem because they are required to declare a major before starting classes. Taking classes in different areas of interest is good. Doing this could help a student learn what his or her true interest is. If you question your major, then look into other options.

  • Tyler Barre

    I disagree. Just because a painter doesn’t like to paint still lives in class doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be a painter.

  • Michael Albritton

    Michael Albritton – I really liked this article. And some of the commenters below are right – this could apply to many other majors. #3 def resonated with me. I didn’t just choose my previous major because it would make me a lot of money, but that was a leading contributing factor unfortunately. Funny enough, even when I got to that point, I found myself wanting/needing to do or be a part of something I love. That is why I am back in school now. I agree with your point regarding looking at other majors as well. Keeping your options open oftentimes forces you to not focus all your efforts on option A. It’s far more beneficial to be “all-in” and giving your best shot before looking at option B and C.

  • Ronald Fersula

    Ronald Fersula – I actually liked this article. It made me think a lot about what i have been doing on my life. I can tell that all those can happen on any major. It is funny how #3 still in my head which was my biggest mistake on choosing my major. I actually learn that you must major on what you actually like, love, and enjoy doing. By reading this article actually made me more secure that where i am now is actually the right one. Like in #2 for me is almost impossible to go out without any sketchbook or my file full of my old works, always trying to find where and how can i fix it to make it better. One thing that i love is check other’s work to see if i can find the way how to fix my mistakes and improve my work. definitely, a good article that everybody should read IF you still thinking or doubting that graphic design is for you.

  • Rachael Cobb

    Rachael Cobb:
    This article is clearly either black or white. There are no gray areas. You either want to be a Graphic Designer or you don’t. I would recommend all students entering or currently attending school to read this article, as it can pertain to all other majors as well and not just Graphic Design. It makes you think about your life and time in another perspective. At the end of the day it’s up to you to become successful by researching and devoting your time to your major/career. As stated in #4- “make sure your school goals are to learn and not just get a degree”. This is so important in everything you do in life. You half to be 100% committed and focused to learn and not “just get by” in life in order to be successful in the right way.

  • Leselle Leuterio

    Leselle Leuterio:
    Well I am not a major in graphic design, but I would not be surprised if this class made me decide or question if I wanted to be one, or take more classes. If these signs are relevant for any or all other majors, then I really need to straighten up. I do not really have any discipline for sitting down, focusing and grinding for what I want to achieve. I feel like this sort of has to do with number 4. Its not completely like I am curious if I would be better at something else, but it is like “what do I want to do for the majority of life, if not all.” Regardless I am still working on that aspect of me and hope that this class will make me disciplined. Maybe I can find tips for eliminating other interests in my life (as much as I would not want to, any suggestions Prof? haha). Anyways I cannot wait to see my progress and potential.

  • Kevin Lai

    I think this post can say a lot to any student, not just one of Graphic Design. I’ve been a student at Valencia for two years and I’m still not sure what I want to do completely. I have many interests and it’s easy to get excited about doing something, but you don’t really realize what you want to do for a long time until you’re actually working hard at it and getting involved with everything that goes along with it. College is supposed to be for finding out what you want to do, and you shouldn’t worry about what other people think of your decisions, as long as they are your decisions. I’m slowly coming to realize that, and even though I was really excited about Graphic Design, I have be real with myself and decide if it’s truly right for me. There’s a lot you can do and learn in this world, and don’t think you have to do anything besides sticking with what you really love doing.

  • Amber Pope

    There are a few people currently in the classes that I’m taking now that I would certainly love to share this with. Graphic Design is something you should really have a passion for, and if you don’t walk into class excited to learn something new, then you’re more than likely in the wrong major. I see people in the field thinking it would be easy, because you just make pictures on the computer or you draw, when it’s so much more than that! They don’t give the classes their all, and they seem bored and they just don’t care. That bothers me because I feel they’re taking away from those of us who actually care and have a passion for it. This is something that would be beneficial to be printed out and handed to every graphic design major. Especially those who are constantly jumping from major to major. I feel like these are great guidelines in order to help an individual determine if they’re in the correct field or not, and it certainly makes me feel even more encouraged that I’m in the correct field.

  • LeanneL

    I haven’t been in this “major” long enough for several of these points to happen. Yet again in the past I most certainly have wandered the internet this for almost every Marketing class at UCF (lecture capture didn’t help this either). Let’s just say during syllabus week as a Graphic Design Production TC, I was on the edge of my seat with excitement!

    What’s making me even more sure about my decision to continue my learning in this creative area, is the thought of my B.S. in Marketing while I’m reading these points.

    None of these apply to my desire to become a designer.

  • Tekoz1

    Angelo Vazquez- For me I believe there are a lot of people that try to join the graphic designer field or major because they think its easy. So they would probably have one of these or maybe all of them. But really being a graphic designer is as challenging or even more challenging than any other other profession. Mainly because you are literally fighting your peers to secure a spot with even one client, for just one poster, logo, etc. Then rinse and repeat for the next job. So I think that if you thought graphic design would be an easy buck then you most definitely have one or more of these symptoms. For me I have always known I was going to be a graphic designer. So this list has no relevance to my life whatsoever.

  • Kirstyn Rhoden

    I’ve never been one to be on my phone or not pay attention
    during class, even if I dislike the subject, because I love learning. I’m
    addicted to it. I’ve always been on top of my game with coursework, so much so
    that I’ve only received 2 C’s in my life; math hates me, and I it. Knowing my
    subject strengths and personal interests, I’ve been thinking about what I want
    to do as a career for over 15 years now. To this day, I’m still unsure of which
    career path to pursue. Money is always at the forefront of my thoughts when I
    consider which career will best satisfy my interests and abilities, mainly
    because I never want to struggle like so many of my family members have, and
    are, from paycheck to paycheck. However, since money isn’t everything and there
    are no guarantees in any field, I have been reevaluating my decision process
    regarding my career choices. Being that I am an extremely competitive perfectionist
    with strong drive towards research, trial and error, and hold considerable
    respect for creative process, I know any career in the Arts will be a good fit.
    I am interested in every aspect of art, and that is where my problem comes into
    play. How do I choose only one career field to begin my professional life? Yes,
    it is possible and common to have more than one degree. With that said, degrees
    cost money. The smartest decision I’ve made thus far regarding figuring out
    which career path to choose is taking different classes in areas that I’ve
    seriously considered pursuing as a degree. At this point in time, I’m uncertain
    that a career in Graphic Design is the right fit for me since I really don’t
    know much about it. Nonetheless, I am excited for the semester ahead of me in
    my first graphic design class and hope this class will provide valuable insight
    into the industry.

  • Kirstyn Rhoden

    Kirstyn Rhoden – I’ve never been one to be on my phone or not pay attention during class, even if I dislike the subject, because I love learning. I’m addicted to it. I’ve always been on top of my game with coursework, so much so that I’ve only received 2 C’s in my life; math hates me, and I it. Knowing my subject strengths and personal interests, I’ve been thinking about what I want to do as a career for over 15 years now. To this day, I’m still unsure of which career path to pursue. Money is always at the forefront of my thoughts when I consider which career will best satisfy my interests and abilities, mainly because I never want to struggle like so many of my family members have, and are, from paycheck to paycheck. However, since money isn’t everything and there are no guarantees in any field, I have been reevaluating my decision process regarding my career choices. Being that I am an extremely competitive perfectionist with strong drive towards research, trial and error, and hold considerable respect for creative process, I know any career in the Arts will be a good fit. I am interested in every aspect of art, and that is where my problem comes into play. How do I choose only one career field to begin my professional life? Yes, it is possible and common to have more than one degree. With that said, degrees cost money. The smartest decision I’ve made thus far regarding figuring out which career path to choose is taking different classes in areas that I’ve seriously considered pursuing a degree. At this point in time, I’m uncertain that a career in Graphic Design is the right fit for me since I really don’t know much about it. Nonetheless, I am excited for the semester ahead of me in my first graphic design class and hope this class will provide valuable insight into the industry.

  • Kiya Long

    Kiya Long – I can honestly say that this kind of course work is not easy by any means necessary. I would never even think about disrespecting my teacher or hinder myself by paying attention to any kind of social media in class. For one, your paying for this class, and even if your not paying out of pocket directly your probably using student financial aid. You might be thinking, “It’s not coming out of my pocket and I get money back for taking the class.” You would be completely wrong!! Your literally wasting everybody’s time and precious resources and those things cannot be put in a dollar form. I have to admit that there are plenty of things distracting me on a day to day basis, but I signed up for this and when I need to focus I do so because it’s important. Ever since I was little I’ve always admired my father. He’s always had this natural ability for anything creative from drawing, to painting, to wood carving, and even playing guitar. He’s been my inspiration since I’ve been born and I want to be just like him. I’m not the greatest artist with a paint brush or with a pencil, but photography is what gets me. The emotion and the natural form of something beautiful that you can capture in photo has always captured my attention. And I would be lying if I said that I haven’t thought about obtaining other degrees and pursing different career paths but that’s because I would love to be able to do it all. Now, I know that’s not realistic, but, I dream big! However the love of photos has always been my passion. I know that I might never get rich this way and for along time that was the only reason I was in school. I actually started school as a potential nursing student. I was doing it because it ensured that I would have job security and financial stability, but I realized after I was 3 classes away from completing my prerequisites that I was never going to be happy in this career field. So, I changed my course of direction and began again. I haven’t always had the best grades, but coming back to school with a whole new perspective drives me to work hard and put 150% effort into everything that I do, because I want to be the best at what do. I want people to see my photo’s and be moved or find personal meaning in them that inspires them. I know that this degree is what I’m meant for and I will do my best and learn, grow, and aspire to be the best.