An internship is an opportunity for students to work in their chosen profession while attending school in order to gain valuable knowledge and work experience.



Most often, interns are not paid for the work they do monetarily, but are instead rewarded by the sharing of knowledge, ideas, opportunities for their portfolio, networks and possibly a permanent job offer if the intern takes advantage of the opportunity to be a valuable employee.
Students in the Valencia Graphics Department are required to take an internship. Students cannot take an internship until they have passed GRA2182C Advanced Graphic Design II OR GRA2143 Advanced Web Page Design with a C or higher. Students probably won’t qualify for a Graphics Internship until their final two semesters enrolled.

You will not be able to register for an internship without following the steps outlined on our blog:



http://valenciagraphicdesign.com/2017/01/plan-to-internship-nextsemester/

East Campus Lab Building 1 Room 213 

Students have access to large and small format laser and ink jet printers, various format paper cutters, board cutters, headphone check-out, loupe check-out, spray booth, viewing booth, light table, camera check-out, scanners, wacom tablet check-out and Cintiq monitors. All this in a friendly social working environment with a modern resources for students to browse and lounge while working on their laptops.

Phone: 407-582-2762           Visit http://multimedia.valenciacollege.edu for current hours and closed dates. Check before you drive.

No Food or Drink Allowed. Certain supplies like custom printing paper, staples, paperclips, xacto blades, adhesive, etc. not supplied to students in the lab.

West Campus Lab 3-150

Students have access to large and small format laser and ink jet printers, various cutting areas, headphone check-out, camera check-out, light table, scanners, loupe check-out, photo tent and wacom tablet check-out. Please be mindful if there are classes in session when using this lab by using only the computers in the back of the room.

Phone: 407-582-1592

No Food or Drink Allowed. Certain supplies like custom printing paper, staples, paperclips, xacto blades, adhesive, etc. not supplied to students in the lab.

Osceola Campus Lab 1-244

Students have access to large and small format laser and ink jet printers, various cutting areas, camera check-out, lights and light cube, media card readers, scanners, loupe check-out, Pantone swatch books, and wacom tablet check-out. Please be patient while we work on making lab improvements you’re going to love.

Phone 407-582-4953

No Food or Drink Allowed. Certain supplies like custom printing paper, staples, paperclips, xacto blades, adhesive, etc. might not be available for students in the lab.

Feel free to request more information! You can also stay up-to-date by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and Pinterest.




Kristy Pennino
East Campus Program Chair /
kpennino@valenciacollege.edu


Meg Curtiss
West Campus Program Chair /
mcurtiss@valenciacollege.edu





Complete list of all campus contacts


Frankly My Dear… It’s Not About You.

by kpennino on May 9, 2007

It’s about…

… the client.
… audience.
… communication goals.
… contributing to the industry.
… learning.
… effectiveness.
… growth.
… the buyer.
… the bottom line.
… the sales.
… the product.
… the rest of the world.

In other words, everything but you.

All too often I witness students and veterans alike defending ideas that they are attached to in an irrational way. Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals. In most cases the elements that are chosen are done so to give the designer a certain pleasure to see a vision or idea executed. We’re all guilty of it to some degree.

In an article titled, The Top 10 Things They Never Taught Me in Design SchoolMichael McDonough writes, “No matter how good your design is…  Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.” It’s important for designers to understand, especially entry-level designers, that we rely on others to pay our bills. By not being helpful to them and instead ourselves, our clients are liable to go elsewhere to have their company’s communication needs met.

Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”. Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me. Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.

With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client. You might be wondering what to say to a client then. I know, it’s hard. You try to remove those words from your presentation vocabulary and they just naturally slip out. My theory is that everyone has been talking so much about themselves for so long on on-line social environments like myspace they just can’t seem to get the words I and me out of their vocabulary when presenting solutions.

Considering the challenge, I have a suggestion: Practice, practice, practice. The more you practice talking about your work the correct way, the easier and more natural it becomes to discuss it in a way that is not about you. Talk about the someone somewhere that you are doing something for. Everything else is filling in the blanks and avoiding the use of “I” and “me”.

  • http://www.thinblackglasses.com Kevin M. Scarbrough

    Excellent article.

    One point that I’d like to add is that a client can often force you to push yourself harder. If you are not able to convince someone you have direct contact with, someone that has absolute (hopefully you’ve presented thoroughly) knowledge about your concept, how do you expect to communicate to someone who has no knowledge or (typically) interest in what you are doing?

    If your idea isn’t selling, work harder. Find a way.

    This brings about another ugly, often unspoken rule of dealing with clients. It isn’t always going to work, especially when you are freelancing and there isn’t a buffer between you and the person who is paying the bills. I say that with much hesitation because I do NOT want to give the impression that at the first sign of trouble you can balk and turn tail, but want to mention it because you must be forever on your guard of people trying to take advantage of you.

    Which brings me to my final point: Contracts. Get it signed. Explicitly state what is due, when it is due, and how much you are going to charge, what are the penalties if payment / information isn’t delivered in time, yadda. If someone hands you a contract, get someone with experience freelancing to review it with you (note: with you, not for you). If you initiate the contract, hit up your friendly neighborhood AIGA for help with the form (they exist, after all, in response to your needs).

    Good luck out there folks.

  • Anselm

    It’s so true!

    Already in my budding career as a designer I’ve had to answer to clients who did not agree with the way I saw things. Personal differences of opinion are no big deal to me, as if the client’s idea makes sense I’ve never had any problem changing it, and I try not to get too emotionally involved with work made for hire. Do not take that as not caring, but rather if I’m working for someone else I know it isn’t about what I feel like doing, it’s often what they tell me they feel like having me do!

    Some changes are easier to make than others, of course. When asked to disproportionately resize a headline font I cringed. (This may be a result of hearing “Hold down shift!” so much.) I think we can all agree though that it’s difficult to have someone who knows very little about design have you do something that goes against all logic and reason and may be just down right bad. I’ve found it helpful to explain my point of view in a nice way, and why I think some things may work better than others.

    Ultimately it really is about the person paying the bill. Regardless of what you want, or what is good design, they have final say, like it or not.

  • Tiffany Ramirez

    It’s important for designers to understand, especially entry-level designers, that we rely on others to pay our bills.
    Unfortunately this is true even though we might not like the idea. For the most part the client or customer are always right, not just in GD, but in other professions as well. I have not been in the work field for design yet, but I have been in hospitality and customer service for a long time and it is a similar situation. There are ways to communicate ideas and suggestions while still remembering what the clients want.

  • Britini Surphlis

    “In other words, everything but you.” This sentence is basically what sums up the article. I have not realized that when being a designer I must think about the client, not what I want or think. This is probably one of the most important aspects to realize to becoming successful.

  • frances Barra

    “They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours”
    This is a key quote because it answers the “why” to the title. As the designer, I am here to, at minimum, meet the challenges of my client. Those needs may not fall in line with my personal preferences. If I LOVE a certain direction and the client’s needs or wants are contrary, I may find my energy level deflating or my desire to “sell them” on my way take over. Knowing this about myself, I need to keep this statement burned into my brain to remind myself that at the end of the day, my ultimate preference to “wow” my client is all that is about me.

  • http://www.myspace.com/mudshck Francisco

    “Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”.”

    This Is true!! I had suffer this bad habit before.

    We need to remember that this field is a business like any other and they’re paying for a service.
    We need to make them feel like they are important; that the work is about them and not us. We have to find a balance of how to share our suggestions or opinion without making the client feel less important.

  • Gilberto Sanchez

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    I can completely agree with the sentence above this business is all about the client and t he work that your doing you cant involve your needs in your work because the client can go elsewhere and they pay your bills.

  • http://www.georgettetorres.com georgette torres

    “the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client”

    Unfortunately that is how the world works, nobody cares about anyone else specially in the work industry. All they want is to get their expectations fulfill and as long as you the designer do that they will be happy and keep you on their side.

    Because really is all about personal interests but since they are paying you the interest that has to be put in priority is theirs

  • Janae’ Britt

    “By not being helpful to them and instead ourselves, our clients are liable to go elsewhere to have their company’s communication needs met.”

    We live in a dog-eat-dog world where everyone is brought up to look after themselves and their own interests. We often forget that in order to look out for ourselves (pay bills, put food on the table, etc), we have to first look out for what our employers want.
    This little excerpt is so important, especially for designers because we base our designs on what comes out of us creatively. It’s hard to stay in the mindset of an employee and not just another kid playing with their paint set.

  • Jodi Miller

    “Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client.”

    Feelings are fickle and become emotional roadblocks. If we know this, why don’t we leave them at the door? It’s really really hard, that’s why! Learning how to put ‘yourself’ on the back-burner and focus on someone else (a client’s) needs takes maturity and perspective, both of which come with practice …. and time!

  • Allen Rayner

    “Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals”. I agree, artist can act as if the design they create are for their own company when it’s not, we all may have our own individual idea on how something should be including the designer and the person paying for the design. The quicker we realize that people’s perception varies widely from religion to politics to art work the better we are off in the end.

  • Virginia Carpenter

    “By not being helpful to them and instead ourselves, our clients are liable to go elsewhere to have their company’s communication needs met”

    Overall, a very good article that reminds students that graphic design is a business and that clients matter.

    However, I don’t think the division is black and white. Client needs and designer vision are not mutually exclusive. Although client communication goals should take precedence, there will always be a place for personal daring in the design world. Otherwise, the field would be stagnant and none of us “creative types” would have anything to do with it.

  • leah webb

    This article pretty much stated how I felt about the “don’t take it personally article”. If you can focus on the objective of the project, not your “motives” or your “creative expression”, life as a graphic designer is going to be much easier on you. Otherwise, you are just going to be another frustrated starving artist, and really doesn’t the world have enough of those already? I’m sure I will feel differently after my first critique, you can’t help but have a bit of a bruised ego after that, but again those are there to help make a better designer out of you/me. It’s why we are in school in the first place. Great article though, I think it may be an eye opener for a lot of people.

  • Rose Batignani

    With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.

    This statement is very important. I work for a corporate firm and need to remind my self at times that anything I do must cater to my company’s profile. This includes: simple page layouts, color schemes, brochures, presentations, press releases, internal newsletters, ads, etc.

    A designers work must always look and sound like it comes from the same company and portrays their identity – not their own. Many designers are always trying to think ‘outside the box’. Sometimes when they do that they loose track of what is most important – the client. After presenting your design you should be able to say why this solution works for the client and how it will help promote the company in the long run.

  • Ann OKeeffe

    “…take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.”

    This is so important because your creation is for someone other than your self. You are creating for THEIR purpose; to sell their product, promote an event or an idea.

  • Lyska. Vanté

    “Everything but you”
    This one phrase you mention from the beginning, the concept of your developping point… delivered so bluntly is what got to me the fastest. It made me think of considering generally of the rules behind great communication. Selflessness is key! Empathising to another’s need is the great deal! Ego is a natural personnality attribute that mankind has had since the beginning of time. It is hard to put aside, yet possible and convenient to facilitate inter-relational understanding.
    The only way to sell or attract an audience is to be the audience selflessly! Become them (note: not part of them!), and understand the truth behind moving foward from pleasing a “client ego”.

  • http://decisiveorigin.com Laurie L Thomas

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them.”

    After 2 years of commission/freelance work, I learn this the hard way.

    However, its the same with school too. when it comes to it, many teachers are bias and I do cater to them.
    After all, I still do need atleast a B in the class. This is why I mentally seperate ‘personal’ work from ‘professional’ work

  • Melissa Provenzano

    “Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me.”

    I chose this excerpt because it brings up a very good point. I guess I never realized… or thought about… how many times I hear the “me” talk. Now that I have read this article, I’m going to take this advice and practice putting the client’s needs/wants before mine – when it comes down to it, it is definitely all about them.

  • Michelle Ledesma

    “With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client. You might be wondering what to say to a client then. I know, it’s hard. You try to remove those words from your presentation vocabulary and they just naturally slip out.”

    i think this is very important you should speak in a well and profession way and also speak in a way that your clients will gain more insted in you and like what you have done

  • Audrey Bay

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    As with every profession, you try to meet a level of personal goals, but at the end of the day, you are really trying to impress someone else. Ego will only get you so far and as you must always be confident about your work, you sometimes may have to take a step back to appease your client. As McDonough says, “You need them. Big time.”

  • Jen Hubert

    “My theory is that everyone has been talking so much about themselves for so long on on-line social environments like myspace they just can’t seem to get the words I and me out of their vocabulary when presenting solutions.”

    “In other words, everything but you.”

    Well this whole blog article in my opinion doesn’t make any sense to me. You have to have “you” in order to have a client, growth, and etc. Without “You,” you don’t have anything such as your creativity, your opinions, and your ideas to have involvement with any project. “You” are the one creating the whole or part of the project. I think you should talk about yourself, maybe not all about you at least enough to tell them, the clients your experience or maybe accomplishments with in the field. The whole point in getting a job is to sell yourself as if you where a/the product. So I feel you need “I” to send or branch out to people what you do and your experience.

  • Doris Rosado

    With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client

    Many designers design with there main interest they dont consider in total what there the customer needs to fulfill there requirements or the brief that the your customer is expecting from you, unfortunately we designers can input our personal input which can harm the final out come
    of the project

  • Javon Johnson

    “They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”
    I choose this excerpt, because it is oh so true, but very seldom realized. And not just for graphic designers, but web designs, software designers and even programmers at times. It is important when designing anything to keep in mind, what the client wants and not what you like or prefer.

  • Harold Ramos

    Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me. Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.

    In any customer service type job the client should always come first. They are your bread and butter and must be made to feel as if they matter. All prospective clients need to feel that their needs will be met with your ideas.

  • Andrea Keller

    “The facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    This statement is so true, but hard to accept sometimes. Of course you like what you have created, but you are not the one signing the check. While it is hard to not put emotion into your work and to not take criticism personally, it is one of the most important things to grasp to grow and be successful.

  • Jon Manock

    With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.

    Its so true, if you say the right words you can sell anything to anyone.

  • Nicholas Miller – GRA1142

    ” Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”. ”

    I find this statement to be true because it seems that using “I like” when writing is overly used and somewhat elementary. I definitely agree with the author.

  • Nathan Arrington

    In most cases the elements that are chosen are done so to give the designer a certain pleasure to see a vision or idea executed. We’re all guilty of it to some degree.

    This is all to formiluar to me. I think everyone I know is guilty of this in one way or another. It spans, not just through their professional lives, but into their personal hobbies and interests. Programmers who only like the software and programs they began with, artists who limit them selves by not wanting to improve or expand upon their technique, musicans who are too comfortable at their current skill level.

  • Diego Dutra

    “the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client”

    This does not make since because you obviously got the client in the first place so they some what agree with your design style. Yes you have to listen to them and take their opinions into mind but the designer is the designer.

  • Christina Flynn

    “take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client”

    I agree with this statement, when I present something to a client it is about THEM the CLIENT. So, I always look in their eyes and see what THEY want and present it to them.

  • Brittany Teunis

    “I have a suggestion: Practice, practice, practice.”

    You really cannot and will not get anywhere without practicing, especially in design. Even advanced designers who are the best of the best have something to learn. Always have an open mind and keep learning, your skills can only grow over time.

  • Praiselynn Santos

    “there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me.”

    I can relate. I spent hours vectoring a beautiful cruiseship; turns out my client wanted a battleship.
    I was bitter. . .because it was about me, me, me.
    The battleship turned out fantastic when I realized it was about the client, client, client.

  • http://lilymommy2000.wordpress.com/ Lily Goldsmith

    My theory is that everyone has been talking so much about themselves for so long on on-line social environments like myspace they just can’t seem to get the words I and me out of their vocabulary when presenting solutions.

    I chose this line because I am absolutley 100% guilty. I even check my blog 100 times a day to see what people think about what “I” have said. the article is a great reminder to check that part of my personality

  • SIMIEN ANTONIS-PARR

    “The more you practice talking about your work the correct way, the easier and more natural it becomes to discuss it in a way that is not about you.”

    A couple sentences before this one it asked the reader to consider the challenge. That would be “me.” Maybe if it is viewed as a business technique that will beneficial… it won’t be such a huge hurdle(challenge) to cross. This is going to take awhile to reverse for myself and others because it has become such a social norm to speak about yourself. So, let me pose the question for others to think about? What will happen to you or what will it give you if you let this part of your dialogue/communication drop?

  • Angela Kreye

    “Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”. Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me. Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts”

    I think this is such an important thing to remember when deisgning something for someone else. It is the key difference between art and design. Art is for it’s own sake, but design has to have a purpose, and that purpose is not just to please the designer.

  • Veronica Perez

    “The more you practice talking about your work the correct way, the easier and more natural it becomes to discuss it in a way that is not about you.”

    This one line really made the lightbulb in my head come on.

    As a current Graphic Design major I have always thought to myself “Wow, I’m going to be making Graphics for clients and everyone is going to love my work, and I will be amazing and me, me, me.” Reading this article made me seriously take a step back and say “Oh wait, that’s right! It really isn’t all about me.”

    I really do need to practice, practice, practice.

  • Crystal Hernandez

    “Frankly my dear,..Its not about you.”
    To me this is the one phrase that holds true when it comes to graphic design. Why? Because people sometimes get the misconception that it is about them. Yea its great to draw and paint something that makes us feel good but if we plan on making a living off of it then we have to make sure that the audience likes it.

  • Sandra Bryan

    I find ” Considering the challenge, I have a suggestion: Practice, practice, practice ” very important in whatever you do. Especially, in design. You have to start somewhere. The more you practice ,the better you’ll get.

  • John Pascual

    “The more you practice talking about your work the correct way the easier and more natural it becomes to discuss it in a way that is not about you.”

    In life you always have to practice. Practice makes perfect. Before you’re going to start something its important to practice on it. When you practice it shows the client that you care about them.

  • Mark Prather

    “Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals.”

    I think this is partly because it’s such a jump from graphic design to art. Where art is all about the artist and bearing the inner turmoil or what have you, graphic designer’s need to be more pragmatic in their products.

  • Marie Alicea

    Respect those people.

    This is key when talking with clients and having them return to us as designers. Showing them respect for their ideas and their vision, and bringing to life what those ideas are through our desings.

  • Maria Calabro

    “…to meet communication goals”.

    How do you reach this goal? That is the essence of a presentation to a customer. All that is VISUAL, the WORDS used to give EMPHASIS to the required theme or subject matter has to be in harmony. Accentuate the fact of that idea of what your client wants and that absolutely has nothing to do with you.

    But, the words are yours and it’s your body giving a presentation. Learning what is in the other mind leaves us developing the ability to jump into someone else’s shoes… Ain’t that something!!

  • Elyssa Coultas

    “…everything but you.”
    These three words sum up this article. Every graphic designer needs to keep in mind that their work isn’t supposed to please themselves, but the client. Of course, the designer should be proud of their work, but should still focus more on the client’s wishes and goals.

  • Caspar Blattmann

    Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”. Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me.

    I have done some design work and from my own personal experience I know how hard it is to communicate not using the me and I words. Designs are very personal. A lot of time, energy, creativity and enthusiasm go into them. And I want to communicate them and get the client excited about them to. But it is true that what the clients thinks and the clients needs are what is important. The difficult part is to be selflessly excited in our presentation about our client and how the design will address his needs.

    It is always good, all though very difficult, to trop these two little words.

  • Leslie Bilger

    “In other words, everything but you.”

    Heu… Yes an No.

    It is not about you because you didn’t do this job for yourself.
    But it is about you because you forgot for who and what you did this job.
    We should constantly remind for who we’re working, what are the goal and rules about the work we have to do.

  • Jihad Canaan

    I completely agree with this article. Sometimes what you think will work isn’t exactly what the client wants. So you have to step out of yourself and find out how you can accomplish their needs in order to be a succesful designer. It is hard to design something you don’t like and still make it good, but that’s what being a good designer is all about.

  • Nathan Nowicki

    “the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client”

    As a new face to the field of design this is one of the biggest obstacles to overcome. This is the point where you have to put self satisfaction on the back burner and put the clients perspective vision in motion. After all the client is the one paying the bills…the article is right “we do need these people”

  • Wilkins Delgado

    With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.

    I believe this to a point, because the client hired you for a reason. They have seen your work and liked it and wanted you to work your magic for them.

  • Lusk, Michael

    “Really, if you ’ re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client.”

    I can see how taking a rational approach, a non personal attachment approach, to presenting to a client and to designing/developing their product, is smart business. Cause your are helping them develop their product not your’s, your product is the costumer service and the knowledge of design and the tools to create what your client wants.

  • Katie Schrader

    “They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    All too often it is easy to lose sight of your client’s needs and wants and instead focus on your own needs. It is very easy for a designer to get emotionally attached to a project. One gets so caught up in what they personally feel about a project, thus it get hard to take that step back and focus on the client’s needs.

    The clients are the ones that have to be happy at the end of the day. Having a project that you are content with but the client isn’t satisfied with is ultimately going to end up with you eating ramen for the rest of your career.

  • Eliud Acosta

    “The more you practice talking about your work the correct way, the easier and more natural it becomes to discuss it in a way that is not about you.

    Its difficult sometimes to want to talk about just your work without really going into detail about yourself or basically just taking about yourself. I agree that the more you practice talking about your work the more natural it will become when discussing your work with any client. In the end, they really dont care about you as a person or an individual, its all about what you can give them or offer them and who potentially is the best.

  • Michael Canning

    “They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    Simply put, this is the only thing you need to be aware of. Their needs and wants, not yours. In this industry that’s all designers do, make product for the CLIENTS, not for YOURSELF.

    Although it may be hard to constantly do, you have to remember it’s still a business. Besides, you dont wan’t to lose your clients, and potential business because you want to be selfish and not cater to them, since they’re the people who are paying you.

  • Viviana Castano

    Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”.

    Feelings, emotions, wants, likes, etc., that’s to be expressed in your own art work. For example, if you paint, that’s your opportunity to express your feelings, emotions, wants, likes, etc. in your work of art. Then when talking about it you say, “I felt…, I wanted…. etc.”
    Designing may feel like your own work of art, in a way it is because you are designing and working on it, but with what the client needs and wants.

  • Carlos Alvarado

    “Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”.”

    Ok, so this sentence really scared me. After reading it I have no idea how I’m going to present any of my projects in my design classes. Even though these projects will sometimes be centered around me (I assume) I’m going to have to practice how to not use those words in presentations.

  • Aaron Thompson

    No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.” It’s important for designers to understand, especially entry-level designers, that we rely on others to pay our bills

    this really spoke to me because it talks about proper work ethic

  • Melissa Cheng

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    I really agree with this. There is a saying that says The customer is always right. And I believe that strongly. So what if you think something is good but is it good enough for your clients?

    Being a designer if you don’t give your clients what they want, don’t even think that you’ll have enough customers to do business with you

  • Halie Coberley

    They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.

    I choose this quote because many times i find my self incorporating my feelings into a work i am doing for someone else when i should be incorporating their thoughts and idea to create what they want, not what i want. It is ok to create what you want when you are making art for yourself, but its not ok when you are creating for someone else!!

  • Halie Coberley

    My reaction to the excerpt is that it is very true when it comes to designers today. they are only interested in what they feel as long as it gets them money. They become biased to their own idea because they think that they are good when they could really take in others ideas to make it better.

  • Adam Moschella

    “They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    I can relate to the article in a sence even with my limited graphic design career experience. I have yet to take on any design jobs, however, if I did, I would always try to complete the job as I saw fit and try to create something that I liked. I would, consider what the client wanted, however, I would mostly create a design that I thought looked good. It is understandable that if I am going to be sucessful in this field I need to foscus on the clients needs and not my own.

  • Santiago Flores

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people.

    This is true not only with this example, but in every industry and with every job its about how you are able to meet the needs of your customer or your client because if you do not have them theeeeeeen your out of business meaning that you don’t get paid. I put myself last and put everyone else first to see how i can serve them and be helpful to them so that they could move on.

  • John Molina

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people.

    I could not have said it any better “I put myself last and put everyone else first to see how i can serve them and be helpful to them so that they could move on.”By: Santiago Flores

    In any job you are hired to do work with the initial goal of it benefitting those who hired you. Designing is no different. Exactly as the post mentioned “we rely on others to pay our bills.” The more selfless you are with your work the more attention you are going to get, yea the work you do is not about what you like or don’t like, it is about how good you can give the people what they want and if you are successful it will ultimately end up being all about you.

  • Cassandra Tosado

    “My theory is that everyone has been talking so much about themselves for so long on on-line social environments like myspace they just can’t seem to get the words I and me out of their vocabulary when presenting solutions.”

    I agree completely with this statement, so many of us are involved with on-line environments, like myspace or any other kind of social web-based site – that we sometimes can’t help but talk about ourselves, or what we’re into, or what we think/feel; seeing as these sites were built to generally share our own thoughts of ourselves or other things.

    It’s very important, however, that we put into practice not “us”.. but “others” first.

  • Christopher Ramos

    It’s natural for people to think of themselves first, human nature makes us think in that manner
    Putting ourselves in front of others.
    Many careers now have you focusing on the needs of others, therefore I completely agree with the way we should be focusing on our clients rather than ourselves.
    Awesome article.

  • Leisha Ramirez

    “All too often I witness students and veterans alike defending ideas that they are attached to in an irrational way. Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals. In most cases the elements that are chosen are done so to give the designer a certain pleasure to see a vision or idea executed. We’re all guilty of it to some degree.”
    -Artists tend to create work based on what they feel is appropriate and that is visually stimulating. Its hard to take criticism from a client you know has no background or taste in art. But as a graphic artist, I can see where “you” does not play in the projects. Its all about the client. But like any other “sales” job out there, throw a pitch. Give the clients ideas and explanations on any modifications and of course practice. Boy, do I need to practice practice practice.

  • David Remedios

    “With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.”
    -Wow, this is very helpful!

  • Amy Kelso

    “Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    This article is so completely true and this statment holds true to anything you apply it to when it comes to assisting a client or just a general customer in every day life. Say for instance you are getting married and you are picking out bridesmaid dresses before the wedding. Say you pick out a dress that looks spectacular on your frame and of course this means these are the dresses you must get b/c all the other girls will look this great in the dress. When in fact they try the dress on and wow totally different look when they put them on. SO say instead you go w/ a dress that fits most any body type and wall-lah….the final product is that everyone is happy and looks amazing on that day.
    It’s about visually what will be appealing to the masses as opposed to what YOU might find engaging. I definitely think this is the case if you are designing a website for different age groups or computer levels. If your site is too complicated for someone who is maybe not computer saavy, you may risk loosing them as a customer if they can’t figure out what you are selling or how to order the product by adding features they maybe visually amazing to you but may make the site too overwhelming for some.

  • Angel Martinez

    All too often I witness students and veterans alike defending ideas that they are attached to in an irrational way

    Most of the time any designer that really had a professional job as a designer is going to defend there design no matter. All artist hate to be told that there design is ugly or lame or could be better, but when someone else is paying for your ideas they have full control in letting you know if your idea is ok to be worth for the job at hand and restrains a artist’s abilities at times

  • DaRosa Sandra

    In an article titled, The Top 10 Things They Never Taught Me in Design School, Michael McDonough writes, “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it.
    Why I chose this and reaction is! Because it make sense, the idea is to sell your idea or your product. Make thing ease for people to understand sell your product for idea faster, be clear.

  • Kathrine Fleming

    “The more you practice talking about your work the correct way, the easier and more natural it becomes to discuss it in a way that is not about you. Talk about the someone somewhere that you are doing something for.”

    The entire article is filled with informative information. The line above is very beneficial information to have right from the start. It will take time to prefect the way in which work is presented, and the more practice from square one the easier it will become.

  • Lee Drake

    “In other words, everything but you.”

    I choose this line because it is true. The client is not looking for what you think looks good, but what they want the design to look like.

  • Qianli Ma

    “In other words, everything but you.”

    Reading through the article, I can completely understand this sentence. As a graphic designer, you could work for fun or for a hobby. But in the reality, you have to have some kind of income to support your spend, daily usage, your material, substitute computer, newer version software or whatever the case maybe. So you have to follow the game rule to be a successful person in the field. I agree with the author, it is everything but me.

  • Thomas Peña

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    Definitely true! Graphics is a service industry and if it does not meet the clients needs, then it doesn’t matter how good your work is or where you studied.

  • Jocelyn Law

    All too often I witness students and veterans alike defending ideas that they are attached to in an irrational way. Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals. In most cases the elements that are chosen are done so to give the designer a certain pleasure to see a vision or idea executed. We’re all guilty of it to some degree.

    this quote means alot to me because sometimes I work on what looks good to me, and not on what the other person is looking for. This blog helped me realize that it really isnt all about me!

  • Braxton Burbage

    Considering the challenge, I have a suggestion: Practice, practice, practice. The more you practice talking about your work the correct way, the easier and more natural it becomes to discuss it in a way that is not about you. Talk about the someone somewhere that you are doing something for. Everything else is filling in the blanks and avoiding the use of “I” and “me”.

    this is a very enlightening point. you shouldn’t always think of yourself and you need to think of others. you must also learn to be more selfless in order to improve your skills in presenting something. this can help in many careers and can even give you a better attitude towards life.

  • Jeff Haughey

    With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.

    This is an excellent bit of advise for anybody who will be involved in graphic arts, or any kind of sales where there is contact between you and the client.

    You are in business to serve the client and provide them with a product that they want. What better way to provide them with what they want, by taking their advice and suggestions and putting it on paper for them. People are egotistical and are attached to their ideas. If you visually display their ideas, chances are they will like it. Sometimes their ideas might be wrong and you may want to attempt to steer them in the right direction, but sometimes this isn’t possible. If you have to do this, try to get the client to think your ideas came from them.

    Remember to give the client what they want, not what you think they need. Everyone has different tastes and opinions, but the only one that matters is the one who is paying for the work.

  • Erica Carrero

    Wow! Great point! I hadn’t thought about this at all till now. I admit that I can be one of those who will defend my work because I like it or because it makes ME feel good but reading this article really impacted me and has changed the way I think about my job as a graphic designer and my relationship with the client. I understand that this is the career that I want to pursue and that if I expect to get paid and make a living, I need to put my feelings aside from my work.

    Thanks for writing this!

    -Erica

  • Mike Lucarelli

    Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”. Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me.

    I and Me are not what your client is looking for. It’s about what “they” want.

    Keeping “me” out of it makes it easier to present
    your designs properly and make a sale more likely.

  • Tiffany Jensen

    “Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals. In most cases the elements that are chosen are done so to give the designer a certain pleasure to see a vision or idea executed.”

    This is definitely something that I need keep in mind. I think that it’s something that I may have difficulties with once I start working for clients. I can understand how many people fall into the “me, me me” trap. You’re asked to create a design. Actually, you’re getting PAID to create a design. So you’re being paid to be creative and use your talents, but it’s limited to what best suits your client’s needs. I hope that I will always keep the 1st Rule of Business (The customer is always right) in mind, rather than what I may like.

  • Jonathan Tenjo

    …you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.
    Meeting the client’s needs it’s the number one thing you should worry about when presenting a product.
    If it meets, you have a secured deal. If not, well… good luck finding more clients.
    Thus, you should not use the words “I” or “me” when presenting to a client.
    Remember… THEY PAY YOUR BILLS!!!

  • Alice Schumann

    “Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals.”

    I agree. Many choose to be a graphic designer because they love art and do not want to be considered a starving artist. Yet graphic design artists, especially, do not work for themselves or for there own pleasure, but for the client. The clients’ likes an d dislikes should be foremost in the artist mind.

  • Alex Bennett

    “Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”. Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me. Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    I agree completely and understand that as designers, we are being hired to create something the way a client wants it created. And we absolutely have to be sensitive to what their needs are and intentional in communicating clearly with them. But at the same time, I think it’s extremely important to develop feelings for the things you work on (if that’s not too weird to say). I mean, we have to be passionate about what we do. We have to find ways to connect and get excited about the projects we’re involved in whether that be for teachers or for clients. Ultimately, yes, it’s all about the client and their needs. But there has to be passion driving us to meet those needs to the best of our ability and pushing us beyond. If we don’t connect to the need of the client and the vision somehow, then the product is… bland. Isn’t art about feeling, connecting, provoking (granted that you consider graphic design art. I do.)? I say what we feel about the work we do does matter to the client because it is partially the means by which their needs are met.

  • Joleen A. Yarnell

    “…take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary…”

    I never thought of doing this. It seems so simple; I think with practice it gets easier. It’s kind of like the opposite of what they teach in psychology classes :-P

  • Kristi Foreman

    My theory is that everyone has been talking so much about themselves for so long on on-line social environments like myspace they just can’t seem to get the words I and me out of their vocabulary when presenting solutions.

    I think we are more naturally inclined to self-govern and are more aware of things as they are directly related to us. Not that we are selfish people but rather are first mindful of our own thoughts, needs, wants or desires. We must acknowledge that and change the direction and how its affecting them or they instead of us.

  • Doug Wise

    “Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”.”

    I chose to highlight this point because graphic design is an art, which involves a person’s creative influences and design choices.

    However, it’s unique, because, unlike most artists who are working to produce something they like in hopes that other people will like it as well, graphic designers must put aside their personal taste at times.

    For that reason, listening and understanding people are two of the most important tools designers should have in their tool kits.

  • Erica Carrero

    “Considering the challenge, I have a suggestion: Practice, practice, practice. The more you practice talking about your work the correct way, the easier and more natural it becomes to discuss it in a way that is not about you. Talk about the someone somewhere that you are doing something for. Everything else is filling in the blanks and avoiding the use of “I” and “me”.”

    Adding on to what I had said before, the suggestion that you provided us is a great example of what we need to do as the next generation of graphic designers. I know it can be difficult to stop thinking of only yourself, especially considering that, as you had mentioned, we live in a world where everyone has adapted to speaking mostly of themselves on myspace and in the on-line community. But practice makes perfect and if we want to be successful in the future, we must first work on it now.

  • Soeh Cotto

    They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.

    If you are going to work for a company you are going to be doing what they want. No matter how good or creative or how better you can do a job with your own ideas, the client wants to see their vision in the project and it’s going to be our job to make those visions come to life. If you hate people telling you how they want something done and you should be selfemployeed. I know people that hate teacher telling them what to draw or how they want a project done. They are going to have to learn that it’s not about them.

  • Lee Waters

    “Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals.”

    I think this has happened to every designer at one point in time. I fell victim to it throughout a lot of my projects, after stepping back and seeing that a majority of my pieces had a certain theme for one project, I stepped out of my comfort zone to do a corporate type of design. It turned out to be one of my favorite and best pieces. Now I’m determined to push my projects even more for the best outcome.

  • Fernando Murrugarra

    “With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.”

    Absolutely correct!

    When handling one’s work, the creator must realize that it’s not just about you but the person, people, and contribution to the industry that matters. As a graphic designer or computer animator, the only part you play in the making of something is helping create it and bring it to life. Everything is a team effort!

  • http://www.freewebs.com/scavengefang Paige Allen

    “Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals.”

    Agree with the explanation above

    Everyone has set personal goals in life. Whether it be personal goals or growth goals. Life has it’s own boundaries. We must set our goals in life, in order to survive this tragic tale. Goals are set in every day lives, whether it be for work or even school itself. We must prove to others we are strong and we can foretell the tale of our own story. Everyone has their reasons for living…if we did not have goals in life…how on earth are suppose to live?

  • Nick Shirley

    “we rely on others to pay our bills.”

    I think this is a very important statement that should be considered by every graphics designer. I also agree that we should put the clients first. A lot of times I think designers make the mistake of sticking to just one certain style and have no versatility. Eventually, this could be a negative, because all your work could look the same.

  • “L” Rosa

    “With that in mind, take the words ‘I’ and ‘me’ completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.”

    That’s absolutely true. After all, it IS the client you are trying to impress. Yes, our own preferences may come out in our work, but we need to teach ourself to conform more to the expectations of the client. But it doesn’t necessarily mean that we can’t have our own bit of style in it. It’s up to everyone to communicate and work together to reach the result they are aiming for.

  • Kaitlin Potts

    “take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.”

    Couldn’t agree more.

    As a graphic designer you work for other people, so you need to think more about your clients ideas and wants instead of your own, its not about you, its the client. They’re the ones that are paying you, so you want to make sure your designs are to the clients liking.

  • Chel-C Moody

    “Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”. Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me. Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    I somewhat agree and disagree with this. If the client is explaining something to the designed and you know for a fact that would not be able to look good and you know it will look like a pile of dog poo I would hope the designer would step in and not exactly say “wow if you do it like this it will turn out like what your dog just did outside” but give some input and take from the clients idea and put some good ideas and things that will make the poopy idea look freakin’ sweet.

  • http://masterskadu.deviantart.com/ Jasper Stephens

    “take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.”

    Old saying “The customer is always right” I say to a point, but they are paying you. You can suggest idea to pitch to the customer to get a paid more money, but still it isn’t about you, its about your client.

  • Dave Dorbat

    “In other words, everything but you.”

    Whenever you design something thats what you have to keep in mind. What does your client want? What is the message they want to convey. What is *their* purpose in having you create this. You arent designing something for them to say “this is how i like it now give me money”. You are designing to someone elses standards and someone elses taste. You may love one type of design but that doesnt mean that the client will. Remember your there to serve them, not yourself.

  • Caitlin Elmore

    “They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    This phrase strikes my attention because it’s very true in the graphic design world. I agree with this statement entirely, although I am somewhat guilty of the “I”, “Me” words too! It isn’t that hard for me to meet somebody’s expectations on a design they ask for, but, when it has no life to the design itself, that’s where I have a problem and I just want to add something exciting that will get a customers attention. If they ask me for an input on what the design should look like, then I would gladly help, but as far as the client wanting something designed to meet their standards, then I can understand and I will do as they say without adding some “I” and “Me” things here and there.

  • Jennifer Grullon

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    This motto applies also, in my opinion to the workforce too. If your bosses are not happy with work you are producing you have to find a way to keep them happy and produce what they feel is beneficial to the company. Because at the end of the day they sign your paychecks. I can feel that this line i can definately incoporate it into my daily life, such as my job, as a Marketing Manager i have to make sure our Clients are happy with our Work. The client is always right…they pay our bills, and provide me with my paycheck. We want continued business from them therefore it’s about them and their needs.

  • Lindsey Rowe

    Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client.”
    I chose this line because this is something I do. I chose my project because, I want to put my own spin on who the client should do his or her business. If I chose to do this in the real world I would run into having problems, and ultimately being fired. So, I am going to set a goal to present my project not saying why I like it, and why it appeals to me. I will look at my classmates as potential clients and practice not using the word I.

  • Diane Zeise

    “Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    I wanted to be a graphic designer because communication through art & the visual is universal. I didn’t even think about the fact that I’m going to be designing for other people & not just me. This is eye opening to the reality that some people are not going to like what I like, & I’m going to have to broaden my artistic style in order to meet the consumer’s expectations.

  • Erica Wheaton

    “They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    This article is 100% correct! With any company, the bottom like is customer service. You cannot run a company without having it. Even though you are the expert in the field and the client is coming to you, the client is the one that is purchasing your product. You cannot leave a client with “buyer’s remorse.”

  • Ashley Atkins

    Frankly my dear: “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time”

    I chose this excerpt because it’s so true. No matter how much you love your design, someone else has to love it. This summer I visited my grandparents and worked for them for the month at their cafe. My grandma wanted me to paint her something for their living room. She said a figure painting, 4 foot by 7 foot. I thought okay this should be fun and drew out some sketches of what I thought would look good, showed them to her and definitely used a lot of “I” statements. She didn’t have the same figure in mind. She wanted something with virtually no detail, whereas I, just finishing a figure drawing class, wanted to do something realistic. So I worked with her, and realized this isn’t going in my living room, it’s going in hers. So I ended up changing the idea MANY times until she was happy. In the end, she loved it! And I realized, I would much rather her love it, than me love it and her hate it. However, it turns I really loved it too! So it worked out well.

  • Cynthia Baptiste

    “…Take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.”

    I think that this is all too obviously true, and I would even go on further to say that this applies to more than just graphic design. Selfishness and self-centeredness has never really helped anyone achieve anything for the greater good.

    A client goes to the designer, not to merely be impressed, but to be helped and to have their needs met. Knowing that makes a designer more apt to want to know their client and discover what their vision for their business/project is.

    And once the designer delivers according to the need of their client, two things happen: The satisfaction of the client is met, and the designer has completed a project successfully.

  • Kristin Murphy

    Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.

    So many people forget that they are designing something for SOMEBODY ELSE! They want to become attached to that piece because something about it symbolizes an event, a memory, a feeling, anything that may have been happening in the designers life. We just have to remember that its about our sharing our talent and knowledge with others who dont have those oppurtunities, but are paying you for your hardwork.

  • Jonathan Pierce

    “you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    Thats a good point I don’t really think about that. your opinion doesn’t really matter because everyone has there own opinion. In order to be professional I need to be able to understand the needs of the client.

  • Amanda Chambers

    “Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals.”

    I chose this excerpt because I hadn’t really thought about that. I have never really had to create a piece of art in the hopes of selling it. I also feel like that would be interesting to do. Taking someone else’s though, feelings and personal goals and seeing if you could visually create it for them. Sounds like a challenge!

  • Kayla Hernandez

    ” Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals.”

    I often have the fear of loathing my client because they might restrain my artistic point of view, but just as often I have to remind myself that this photo shoot isn’t about what I want, it’s about what they need, and sometimes, I might learn a thing or two from them..always think inside ‘their’ box

  • thomas huynh

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    Somebody definitely has to buy it, figuratively and literally. Your concept has to agree with your client and your client pays your bills.

  • Desiree Pirela

    This is a great article, I would have spoken all the time about me and what I like for the design, but now I understand that it is just wrong. It makes sense because thinking of me as a client, I would only care of what I want. I just have to get use to talk the correct way by practicing.

  • camilo avila

    “take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary”
    welll I think that this excerp defines completely the graphic’s designer job because satisfyng the clients need is the most important thing and I agree we rely on others to pay our bills so that’s why designers have the need to know how to talk to people and explain their work to their clients in order to convinced them that it works and make sure it is exactly what they are looking for. All Im trying to say is that the client’s opinion matters more than yours!

  • Nate Valdez

    It’s about…

    … the client.
    … audience.
    … communication goals.
    … contributing to the industry.
    … learning.
    … effectiveness.
    … growth.
    … the buyer.
    … the bottom line.
    … the sales.
    … the product.
    … the rest of the world.

    In other words, everything but you.

    Truer words were never spoken…

  • Edith Oquendo

    “With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client. ”

    To add to that in very simple words, you become your client, you see what their vision and translate what they want and make it a reality… If you can dream it you can do it!

  • http://www.merchspin.com Dylan Kane

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    Re-quoting the article’s Michael McDonough quote, I could not agree more. This idea should be burned into any designer’s mind! Clearly, the graphic artist is the least important person in a business situation. It is about the client and everyone else involved; we are merely pawns.

    Being that I work for a screen-printing company and make designs for a range of different clients, I deal with this issue on a daily basis. Sometimes the client will give you artistic freedom but MOST of the time this is not the case. My words of wisdom are: Learn to accept having your designs butchered!

  • Eric Montalvo

    “facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    Couldn’t agree with you more. Its like what all the buisness workers say, “the customer is always right”

  • Lori Paschal

    “Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    Most artists develop personal, if not emotional attachments to their work, and therefore experience difficulty “letting go.” They might feel about their latest work as one might feel about their child. This also contributes to the use of “I” or “me” when presenting the work. A rational artist or designer would best take the position of a surrogate parent, developing and nurturing the piece to its fullest potential with the intent of turning it over to its rightful owner.

  • Steven Conrado

    “With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client”

    I found this article very informative. When it comes to the project, I have nothing to do with it. Its all about what the client wants. Being an artist, this is something new to me and after reading this article I realize that I will have to focus on the client’s wishes no matter how ugly I think they are, after all they are the ones paying me.

  • Lisa Lauttenbach

    “By not being helpful to them and instead ourselves, our clients are liable to go elsewhere to have their company’s communication needs met.”

    The customer is always right. You have to give them what they want. They are paying you to create something specific that they obviously can’t. It’s their money, they’ve got the right to be picky! Help yourself by helping them.

  • Cyndi Boggs

    “In most cases the elements that are chosen are done so to give the designer a certain pleasure to see a vision or idea executed. ”

    As mentioned in the article we are all guilty all this in someway. Probably the most guilty when us “babies” are just starting out. I mean as artist these projects and jobs are our babies and we forget that it is not just ours and we are here to serve the client and get the job done. But I think over time we will grow out of pleasing ourselves and we won’t have our design revolve around us.

  • kristin budesa

    “Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    While I believe that this is true – if you’re producing a product for a client, you must first make sure that you are producing something up to their standards and likings. But at the same time, while the client may not care about what you like, feel or want, doesn’t mean you can’t also produce a final product that satisfies both you AND the client. When I create a piece of art, I have to be completely satisfied with what I’ve created and for the most part, it goes against my beliefs to produce something and put my name on it, if it’s not to my liking or taste.

  • Stephen Carey

    Until, actually going threw this in real life, you never know how important making your client happy! The clients pay your bills and pass along to others about your work and how good or bad it was. If your goal inst to please your client then you cant be a graphic designer in my opinion, unless you are working for yourself. Its your job to visually stimulate your client as THEY see fit. The more you open your mind to the revisions given to you by your clients, the further your work will progress quicker and quicker. “TWO heads are better then 1″

  • kevin Mccrystal

    In other words, everything but you.

    I used this excerpt because it is true that in the working world its always about everything else but you. When I read this excerpt the first thing that came to mind is my job and how everyone else is first before me.

  • Plinio Tejeda

    With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.

    I often feel as though, if is not me controlling the whole design project it will never come out to my expectations, but must importantly we as designers have to work together to deliver accordingly.
    Designers definitely depend on the client.

  • Alison Toro

    “Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    This is very true. Alot of the time people can’t get past how they think something should look like or how it doesn’t look right or its not the normal way you would execute the project but when it comes to the end its not what you want unless your doing it for you. People come to you the artist becuase they want something from you, your creation but so that they can use, appeal or see what they see in it.

  • Jade Lawhon

    With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.

    Okay so being a designer, it’s up to you to make the “design”. It isn’t ever going to be about just you and what you want to do. When your working for a client, it’s always going to be about the client. Easy concept, fortunately you have the power of suggestion, but thats about as far as it goes. Your happiness and the consumers happiness could and sometimes will be two totally different things.

  • Thanpisith Chanakul

    “It’s about…

    … the client.
    … audience.
    … communication goals.
    … contributing to the industry.
    … learning.
    … effectiveness.
    … growth.
    … the buyer.
    … the bottom line.
    … the sales.
    … the product.
    … the rest of the world.

    In other words, everything but you.”

    Unless you work for yourself and come up with your own graphic designs that keep you busy everyday; then of course it’s gonna be about the client, the audience, the buyer, and etc.

  • Linda Poiesz

    “Usually the designer describes what they have done by beginning with the words, “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”. Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me. Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”

    As a marketing minor, we cover this type of topic in our class, too. Marketing strategies usually fail when only the self is considered, not the client or consumer. In graphic design as well as marketing, you’re only going to be successful if you deliver what the public wants or needs, not just what you want or need.

  • http://100poundsofgood.com JOEY WERNER aka JOS.A

    “We’re all guilty of it to some degree.”

    This is one of the few sentences I really agree with in this article. Maybe it’s because I am more of an artist than a designer at heart, but In my design work I want to reflect at least some portion of myself or my psyche. I have decided that if I have to live, then I have to die. So in the meantime I want to create as many things as I can, so hopefully when I am gone I have left behind a bunch of awesome art and design of all shapes, colors, sizes, and mediums. And I want the people who care enough to keep and collect my work, I would like them to know I did the design, art, project for the art of it, not for the money I would make. I think it shows in your designs when you lose that sense of artistic inspiration.

  • Steven Yu

    It’s about…

    … the client.
    … audience.
    … communication goals.
    … contributing to the industry.
    … learning.
    … effectiveness.
    … growth.
    … the buyer.
    … the bottom line.
    … the sales.
    … the product.
    … the rest of the world.

    In other words, everything but you.”

    This statement to me is very true in graphic design. Its all about what the consumer wants and you as a designer have to deliver that product; weather you like it or not.

  • Keren Kuilan

    Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.

    One of the hardest things I had to learn in my work was figuring out my clients needs. Even if they still weren’t exactly sure of what they wanted. I had to focus on finding something that best fit them.

  • Freddy Debord

    “…what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client.”

    Yes, another one of those harsh realities in life we all have to live with. I would imagine that, for anyone looking to enter this industry with strong artistic aspirations as well, this concept is the most complicated to master. In addition to the advice offered in the blog, effective communication during initial meetings should also get you closer to the goal at hand; getting to know as much about the client and what they stand for can help you decide the best approach towards the project.

  • Julia Miller

    “Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me.This is a great line because its not only the designers who are guilty of thinking “me, me, me”, its human nature. But, regardless of the fact that feeding our own pleasure is embeded within us, it really is important to realize that being a designer means that we need to take that mentality and barry it in a closet because we need to meet our clients needs to be successful, not our own.

  • Jonathan DuFault

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    I love this line because I think I have a problem with loving my ideas or pieces too much. when I’m at home working on a project, it’s easy for me to get lost in that project sometimes. I work on a certain idea for hours, the whole time thinking about how wonderful it is, lol. But, without fail, as soon as my brother gets home and has a chance to see it he tells me how much he does not like it. It reminds me that no matter how much I like an idea, it’s not always about me.

  • Daniel Canepa

    “take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client” I actually do have this problem goin on right now, And it’s kind of hard to put it aside. My boss has made me aware of it when speaking to a guest at my job, so after that I am aware of the times I say them but after I already said them. It’s just a little hard to stop when I’m so use to referring to them.

  • Gabriel Zayas

    “Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me.”

    While doing my research for Tutorial 1, I came across something that Herb Lubalin said. “I’m my own client” praised Lubalin. He was referring to how he was his own boss – never needing to compromise his wants for that of the client. This blog seems to touch on the opposite end. Every one has to pay their dues and work from the bottom up. I think it’s important to remember that being a graphic designer is a career, a j-o-b. So unless you prefer being a starving artist, always put the consumer first. Welcome them into your home, grab them a cup of coffee, and let them make the decisions. Although the client may have the graphic design desires of a five year old, he also pays better. So take it with a grain of salt and pay the bills. Hopefully one day we can all be as blessed as Lubalin.

  • DrewWoerner

    not to sound trite, but reading this beings to mind the adage;

    “it not about what your country can do for you…”

    well now it seems appropriate to remix that a little;

    its not about you, but what you can do for your …client.

  • Rachael Truex

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    When in the business, you have to have an open mind because not everyone likes the same thing. If you want to go far, versatility is key.

  • Nestor Vera

    Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals.

    I find myself in this situation a lot, I tend to attach to ideas that doesn’t have sense in that moment, I think is because as designers as well as person we might think our idea is completely correct and that doesn’t have any mistake. I tend to block myself by focusing in my mind that is right, instead of looking to how could it be arranged and improve. This is something I will have to work on.

  • Shauna Vatovec

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    Being a first for everything in the field of Graphics the idea of someone not liking your work tends to throw out a scare but I completly agree with this statement because we rely on those people.

  • Lencia Marc

    It’s important for designers to understand, especially entry-level designers, that we rely on others to pay our bills.

    This sentence is one that I need to keep in mind. Some of us, when we have a job, we tend to disrespect our boss. But we can’t do that in Graphics. We can’t disrespect our clients. They have the check that’s gonna pay our rent/mortgage.

  • Caitlin Dundey

    “It’s about…

    … the client.”

    It may have been the first thing of the blog, but i feel its the most important (prob why it IS listed first) because in this industry, it really idn’t about you. Its about creating designed fro others based off their needs and their wants. Not ours.

  • Mark Boulier

    ““I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”. Ah, yes, you see there? Notice there is an absence of goals, communication, audience, client… it’s me, me, me.”

    I do this a lot more than I would like to admit, and have to keep mentally reminding myself not to. It’s a good tip to be reminded of.

  • Mark Crane

    “With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.”

    This is so true, we go into graphic design because we love it, but what is the point of graphic design? to do jobs for your client, and make them happy.

  • Sean Irvin

    “the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client.”

    I know that there are times when I do like to create for myself and some of these projects have been the most fun for me to work on. But business is business and we may sometimes be challenged with a project with which we feel no real attraction to. People choose a designer because they like the artist certain style, but they already come with what they want “in their own heads” and they only want a translator to translate what they have already approved to themselves. While it can be challenging to interpret someone’s idea that is part of the fun of being a designer. Also, you gain an opportunity to think differently with each client. Embrace this chance for it can help you grow and push your abilities further than you ever thought before.

  • Jason Byrd

    “With that (THEIR needs) in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client.”
    It is always the professional that gets satisfaction out of the work completed as long as there is a focus on the client. It would be pointless to even persue any field or profession without a client. Focus on the client and thier needs will return to the professional a sence of satisfaction. Its all well and good to have satisfaction in ones own ability, but its like going to a party for yourself by yourself. That would be absolutely boring. So the words “I” or “me” will be stricken from the vocabulary when making a presentation.

  • Herbart Ruiz

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it.”
    I love this line, because it’s so true. In Graphic Design or any sales environment, you have to forget about yourself and keep your client’s needs first. It doesn’t matter how extraordinary your work may be if it doesn’t solve your client’s needs.

  • Adam Rokowski

    My theory is that everyone has been talking so much about themselves for so long on on-line social environments like myspace they just can’t seem to get the words I and me out of their vocabulary when presenting solutions.

    I like the theory expressed here because it is unadulterated truth, we as a society have become so selfish that even when our efforts are directed in a work related situation for someone else we still cant seem to disconnect our own opinions causing the product to suffer.

  • Matt Volodzko

    They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.

    This seems so true for being in this field. An artist does have to rely on their own originality. But when working for a client you are tending to their needs. This made me think more as a business person.

  • Pedro Recio

    “All too often I witness students and veterans alike defending ideas that they are attached to in an irrational way. Irrational meaning that instead of choosing design elements based upon factual rationale to meet communication goals, they have instead chosen the elements based upon how it makes them feel or personal goals. In most cases the elements that are chosen are done so to give the designer a certain pleasure to see a vision or idea executed.”

    This scenario is an eye opener for me. Everyone thinks because this is an industry that is art based, that it is driven by feeling of the artist. In the end it is a business like any other; you must cater to your customers. Definitely share your knowledge and suggestions, but make sure this applies to their needs and what will better them, therefore bettering you.

  • Rosalba Maldonado

    “I like…” or “I feel…” or “I wanted…”.

    My survival in business will depend on clients. We need to determine and understand their needs, instead of imposing our point of view.

  • James McComb

    ‘“No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.” It’s important for designers to understand, especially entry-level designers, that we rely on others to pay our bills. By not being helpful to them and instead ourselves, our clients are liable to go elsewhere to have their company’s communication needs met.’

    To me this is a very important statement. More than making nice designs for yourself, a graphic designer makes designs for others to use and enjoy, and for that you have to treat those people well.

  • http://wwww.myspace.com/Sonacitypro Michael Fried

    “Frankly My Dear… It’s Not About You.”

    The title is just perfect, it says all it needs to. In the graphics world, the business is all about the customer and what they like and if you can’t deliver you are not going to get the job. It’s what they like and how they like it.

    Great blog to let everyone know how it is and should be.

  • Llay’n M.

    “Really, if you’re being rational, you should be sticking to the facts, and the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. ”

    Business is business and whatever the business requires its members to do is necessary and always vital for the prosperity of that business. If someone high rank in the business has an image that they need a designer to create, that image cannot be changed to fit the personal likes and dislikes of the designer, because the company is more important.

  • jim boloshi

    With that in mind, take the words “I” and “me” completely out of your vocabulary when presenting a solution to a client..
    its about the client not you

  • Brian Zarajczyk

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.”

    This is very true in any creative medium, I’ve spent countless hours perfecting ideas to my liking, only to find I was the only one who ‘got it’.

  • Wyatt Holland

    It’s about…

    … the client.
    … audience.
    … communication goals.
    … contributing to the industry.
    … learning.
    … effectiveness.
    … growth.
    … the buyer.
    … the bottom line.
    … the sales.
    … the product.
    … the rest of the world.

    In other words, everything but you.

    Working as a designer you are working for your client an all else that follows behind them. It is about pleasing them, your boss. If youre stuck in yourself you will fail by not being able to reach out beyond yourself!

  • Lance S. Merkel

    It seems strange to take the ‘I’ and ‘me’ out of your verbiage when talking about your work. I’ve worked in a modern large engineering firm for the last 8 years. Coming from that Conservative Corporate Culture, NOT bragging/reminding people about what you have done is something of an anathema to your workplace life-expectancy. You need to remind the managers of what you have done. Otherwise they tend to devalue you. Then the next thing you know…you’re out of a job. That is as one of the next 1-3 younger, hungrier up & comers, who is always vying to take your place, one day…finally does. Perhaps this is 180 degrees different in the field of Graphic Design/Arts. Still, if I ever peruse a career in this field I’ll make a large effort of deconditioning my previous work habits and endeavor to follow your free advice.

  • erika Ruvalcaba

    It’s about…

    … the client.
    … audience.
    … communication goals.
    … contributing to the industry.
    … learning.
    … effectiveness.
    … growth.
    … the buyer.
    … the bottom line.
    … the sales.
    … the product.
    … the rest of the world.

    i think this is so true, we have tie for work which may include catering to other(boss, Client) to get the job done and money in your pocket and then we have our playtime (personal art work). this exerpt is very true.

  • Sean Callahan

    I know this article is several years old, but I definitely understand it. I am just starting out in the graphic design program, but I have been asked to create things by my boss a few times.

    I have a tendency to get upset when I give her something and she makes a bunch of changes to it that I don’t really like. Sometimes it’s hard to remember that she is the president of the company, and these are her marketing materials, so she should have the final say.

  • Brittany Olson

    I completely agree with this article. When working for others, more so when dealing with clients, your going to have to put your opinions on hold at times. Holding true to what the article mentioned, “the facts are that what YOU like, feel and want does not matter to your client. They want to know how you are going to meet THEIR needs, not yours.”. This can be hard for people who can not take criticism, or have to have their way. In the end your working to appeal to the needs of the client, because it’s their company. Stubbornness will get you nowhere. If fact it could lead to you not even getting a job

  • Keala Lagunero

    “No matter how good your design is… Somebody has to buy it. Respect those people. You need them. Big time.” – Michael McDonough, The Top 10 Things They Never Taught Me in Design School.

    This is totally an agreement, and a great motto for young designers to live by. The client doesn’t want to hear about the designer’s–YOU, nor the designer’s personal goals, visions or needs. The client wants to hear and see their company’s needs, desires and visions come through.
    No matter how much you(the designer) like it and no matter how brilliant you think your idea(s) are the company is paying for it! If you want your paycheck you need to give them what they want! You don’t want to be known as “that designer who has great ideas but only for her/him self.” You should want to be known as “that designer that can pull the clients ideas and visions and goals out.” “That designer is totally committed to her/his clients needs.” “That designer can bring his/her passions, talents out of themselves and give the client a product that makes the company productive.”

  • A. Alex Smith

    Coworkers at my day job can have trouble seeing past themselves to the bottom line of the company or the other needs, and that’s in hospitality, which should be all about the service. The primacy of ‘I’ is hardly limited to the design industry. It does seem to flourish most among those who create, however. Art for its own sake can stand alone on ‘I.’ The fact that the designer is providing a service to a client often fades, lost behind the designer’s ideas. The personal aspect of creation may be inextricable. Those words were ingrained well before the incessant self chatter of online social media that Kristy Pennino might find suspect. However, her suggestion – to actively avoid the words ‘I’ and ‘me’ – really could derive some benefit.

  • Valerie Marquez

    For a lot of people, the idea of creating quality work that will please someone other than yourself is truly a difficult thing. Work that is created by individuals are usually done to please themselves. Its an idea or a feeling that is portrayed in their work making it very personal, but now when you’re trying to please a client, you can add just enough of your feelings to suggest ideas to them and you may even get lucky. In the end, most of your ideas get tossed into the garbage can and the clients ideas, whether sensible or not, is all that matters. Luckily, this is how I’ve trained myself when creating work for others, telling myself repeatedly…”it’s not about you Valerie… It’s all about them.”

  • Alexander Sedov

    “It’s about…

    … the client.
    … audience.
    … communication goals.
    … contributing to the industry.
    … learning.
    … effectiveness.
    … growth.
    … the buyer.
    … the bottom line.
    … the sales.
    … the product.
    … the rest of the world.

    In other words, everything but you.”

    I agree that for the most part your job is to satisfy your clients, but my opinion is that you should search for the companies that are represents you personality and real you, perhaps may alternate you work based on companies goal but when your creativeness been taken out completely, you would not be satisfied with your job or do well. I guess sometimes you should think of requirements as a direction and a new way to express yourself, play with things you have on the clients list

  • http://www.facebook.com/danielrckstr Daniel Andres Munoz

    I can honestly tell you that this is the truth. My brother is a graphic designer and I’ve seen most of the work he does. He is a graphic designer for funeral homes, where he does the prayer cards, banners, etc. He tells me that when he does his work, it’s all about the families satisfaction than his own. He has to make a montage of pictures for the person who passed away. He works on each job constantly just to make it as best as he can, and always turn it in to print before the due date. I always think that when it comes to working as a graphic designer for a certain company or doing a certain type of design for a client, it has to be well done so it pleases the client. Everyone has a different taste in art, and design, so it’s best if you experiment with your work as much as you can to see the possibilities of how it will come out in the end.

  • Kirstie Boger

    I love this article. I have thought to myself that with twitter and facebook the next generation will grow up shallow and self centered because social sites are “all about me”. I think that young people will have the technological advantage because they have grown up using and learning graphic technology but as you said we need to learn to take the words “me and I” out of our vocabulary. It is all about the buyer/client. Something is only as valuable as the person who wants it. So no matter how “cool” the designer makes something if it doesn’t serve its purpose and please the client then its of no use to anyone.
    “It’s about…

    … the client.
    … audience.
    … communication goals.
    … contributing to the industry.
    … learning.
    … effectiveness.
    … growth.
    … the buyer.
    … the bottom line.
    … the sales.
    … the product.
    … the rest of the world.”
    Excellent phrasing… straight forward to the point enough the new ADD generation can understand bottom line, “It’s not about you”

  • Karen Marin

    This is something everyone should read before even entering the design field. It’s true that some people only think about themselves when they ought to be thinking about what the client likes and not what we like.
    It’s hard to think of what others want though when we really only know what we like, so when describing your idea, it’s hard to not include words like “I” or “me”. But like this article has mentioned, practice makes perfect. You have to know that it’s not all about you and in reality you are at the bottom of the list of things.
    This generation has it especially hard with social sites where they grow up thinking that it is all about them. They are going to get a harsh slap on the face when the time comes where they are told that it’s not about them, and that they could lose a client and money if they don’t change their pattern of thought.

  • SamiGirl

    I love this article! It explains so well the duality between
    artistic and realistic qualities one must have as a graphic designer. I do
    believe there is a large number of students with only artistic traits that
    choose this major because on average it pays better than other fine arts
    careers. I mean I also think there is an equal amount of students who choose
    this major because they can edit pictures on Photoshop well, but that isn’t what
    this article is about. I believe that some people are under the impression that
    a designer and an artist are the same thing and this is the basis for this
    whole article. “To design means to plan” according to Kristy, the author, and I
    whole-heartedly believe that. To design doesn’t mean to express, to design
    doesn’t mean to fulfill your needs, and to design certainly doesn’t mean that
    you can make something against a client’s wants. Having a good realistic mind
    can tell you that there is no art unless the bills are paid and that above all
    else the client has to be happy. For those people who love art and love to
    express their art in an open setting, I do not want to discourage you in my
    response. I actually just encourage those who do not think realistically to
    practice it because it is a large part of this career path.

    –SamiGirl Sherrick
    Gra1142C T+Th form 9-12

  • MariaCruz

    I completely agree with this article! I experience this myself each and every time I present a project to one of my employers. It really is hard to try and communicate your purpose and idea’s to a client without mentioning yourself. It truly is and will never be about you, but always the client. Always respect their needs and keep their ideals first in your minds rather than your own. After all, without the client, there would be no project. There are many graphic designers out there in the world, especially nowadays. That amount will only grow, so it is pertinent that you show your clients why it is a great decision on their part to chose you to aid in their success.

  • Kaela Champion

    I agree 110% with everything mentioned in this article. Even though I have just begun a graphic design class, there is a high chance Graphic Design will end up as my major. The first time I was sitting in class I was already thinking about the “what if my ideas aren’t good enough.” But in all reality I won’t be creating random designs, I’ll have my customer to stimulate my ideas. If I stay focused on making sure I’m great at what I do and my main concern stays focused on the customers, I’ll be more likely to succeed. I’ve always wanted a career that helps people, so I definitely find the importance of taking the words “I” and “me” out of my vocabulary when it comes to designing. It’s all about making the customer happy by creating a design exactly like they wished for. And it’s the designers job to not only create but also to provide a sense of comfortability and security that they will have a good end result.

    Kaela Champion

  • C.James

    Very true, my husband was my first client. I disliked the logo he wanted, but I did it for him as he wished.

    • kpennino

      the point is the decisions we make all come back to a reason other than ourselves. our clients need to be aware this same advice often applies to them. the logo for their company isn’t about the company’s owner. it’s about that owner’s goals for the company, message, audience and what image they want to portray to that audience. i think your husband should read this article as well. ;-)

  • Lizette Chacon

    I agree with these article. It is clear and explain so well what is to be a graphic designer. A graphic designer should care about their customers, in my opinion it’s all about the clients needs, a good graphic designer should always please its clients and follow the client’s ideas, because at the end is the client that one who is paying for the work that the designer is going to do,so they should get what they want for their companies. A designer should give all their passion and talent to their work, in order to create a product that satisfy the client.

  • Sarah Vidal

    Thank you for this article! It is indeed eye-opening and helpful to anyone aspiring to succeed in this field. It only makes sense that the client’s need should always come first, as the wise business saying goes, “the customer is always right.” Unfortunately, as we venture deeper into “generation me,” we tend to put our own want before our client’s need. Being a novice intern last semester, I had to learn this lesson the hard way. More than once, I was sent back to the drawing board because I infused too much of my own desire into my client’s work. Even after these episodes, I am still in the process of truly grasping this lesson. It does take time to digest the fact that what we want does not matter at all to the client. Our job entails listening, and then executing what the client requires. No room for “me”.

  • Adriana Nelson

    I agree with this article. Often times we are so used to using I and me that it is really hard to not use it. I think that learning it really takes experience. We can read it in an article such as this one and agree with it but when it comes to actually selling a design, it is something that takes time to get used to. Graphic Designers are people that stand behind the scenes, the creator of the design but ultimately people will identify it as the company’s representation/logo rather then looking at it and knowing which designer created it. I think this is why the industry puts an emphasis of it not being about the graphic designer. It’s more important that the design properly represents them and helps build their name and image then to give full recognition to the designer. It’s a part of the job and something the designer has to get used to but in the end, having your design there to give a visual representation to the company is in itself rewarding. When you see people look at your design and have a positive view about it and know exactly what company is behind it, it pays off in the long run.

  • Jackie Gambill

    Your views are especially appropriate for the younger generation. I’m a little older and have probably done my part in giving my son and daughter as many things and experiences as I was able to, so that in some ways they may feel entitled and that the world is in fact all about them. Today’s technology, while wonderful in so many ways, also contributes to this with its encouragement of selfies and self-expression sometimes taken to ridiculous lengths. Working as a designer is a great way to develop a healthier perspective on this, and to recognize that many things can be about you, but graphic design is not typically one of them! I like the idea of being mindful to take “I” and “me” expressions out of your equation. It’s not as easy as it sounds, either. Like any skill, it will get easier with time. Good thoughts!

  • Kayle Fox

    I completely agree with everything you’ve mentioned above. You explain very well how being all about me, me, me can be ultimately destructive to your business and overall clientele. In this line of work caring about what you like and what you don’t like will get you nowhere. It is always all about your clients! Like Pennino said, your clients basically pay your bills. So in order to keep up with those bills and your lifestyle then you need to keep your customers happy. And in order to keep your clients happy you need to make sure your main focus when designing something for them is on what THEY want in their design, not what YOU want.

    Kayle Fox

  • Janeza Dino

    As of right now, I focus a lot on my own stuff. I work to improve my skills, my style, my perception, my knowledge, etc. I take in critique pretty seriously. As so will I in the next few years until I graduate, get a Bachelors, perhaps even while I pursue my career. Today’s society also encourages you to “not care” about what other people say, but not in this industry. Perhaps, as a student, it’s quite important for us to focus on ourselves for now. But in the end, all the self-improvement is for the benefit of both ourselves and more importantly, our clients. Truly, It’s all for the reward, your clients’ happiness, your paycheck, the lesson, “the bottom line,” just not “me.”

    Janeza Dino

  • Kamili Hawker

    This review is great. I’m new to graphics design and these are some great early pointers. Knowing that I’m usually on online social media sites i can relate to this easily. You also stress tips on things people in my generation studying graphics should work on. Awesome review.